Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am making an app that has a grid of images with text and each one opens a different activity. It works fine but just for design purposes I want to replace my if-else statements with switch statements (which I assume I can do) however it doesn't work. Right now my working code to set the label on each image is:

if(position == 0)
        textView.setText(R.string.zero);
    else if(position == 1)
        textView.setText(R.string.one);
    else if(position == 2)
        textView.setText(R.string.two);
    else if(position == 3)
        textView.setText(R.string.three);
    else if(position == 4)
        textView.setText(R.string.four);
    else if(position == 5)
        textView.setText(R.string.five);
ect....

I want to use:

switch(position)
case 0:
   textView.setText(R.string.zero);    
case 1:
   textView.setText(R.string.one);
case 2:
   textView.setText(R.string.two);    
case 3:
   textView.setText(R.string.three);
case 4:
   textView.setText(R.string.four);    

but when I did that ever label was the last one that I defined (in my example it would be "four"). I also have a similar code for each object to start a different intent with the position variable however that does the opposite and makes every intent equal to the first one. Is my syntax wrong or will this not work for my situation?

share|improve this question
31  
You need to break; after each statement in a case, otherwise it flows down, so you'll always get the last case. – Sotirios Delimanolis Jun 27 '13 at 14:06
1  
@SotiriosDelimanolis put it as an answer – Blackbelt Jun 27 '13 at 14:07
    
Thank you everyone! I didn't realize you needed a break when you don't have a return – Ryan Sayles Jun 27 '13 at 14:12
1  
Don't forget to add a default block as safety net for values out of the switch's range. E.g. log this case or throw an exception, depending on how hard you want to be. – LastFreeNickname Jun 27 '13 at 14:28
1  
That is another quick question, should I have a default even if nothing can possibly go out of the range? For example, I have 12 items, so I'll have case 0-11, do I still need a default? – Ryan Sayles Jun 27 '13 at 14:30
up vote 61 down vote accepted

You need to break; after each statement in a case, otherwise execution flows down (all cases below the one you want will also get called), so you'll always get the last case.

switch(position) {
case 0:
    textView.setText(R.string.zero); 
    break; 
case 1:
    textView.setText(R.string.one);
    break; 
case 2:
    textView.setText(R.string.two);   
    break;  
case 3:
    textView.setText(R.string.three);
    break; 
case 4:
    textView.setText(R.string.four); 
    break; 
}

Here's the official tutorial explaining when to and when not to use break;.

share|improve this answer
5  
+1 for the explanation and the link. – Maroun Maroun Jun 27 '13 at 14:14
76  
A case switch got 23+ upvotes? – Jared Burrows Jun 27 '13 at 15:03
6  
@JaredBurrows SO is generous. – Sotirios Delimanolis Jun 27 '13 at 15:04
1  
I just made it 40. – MD Sayem Ahmed Mar 2 '14 at 5:50
10  
Someone was probably jealous of the easy rep you got. :P – Matthew Apr 9 '14 at 1:26

You need to break; after each branch:

switch (position) {
    case 0:
        textView.setText(R.string.zero);
        break; // <-- here
    // etc
}

Legitimate uses of switch when you don't break exist, those are called fall throughs; or because you return or throw.:

switch (someNumber) {
    case 0:
        return 0; 
        // no need for break here
    case 1:
        throw new IllegalArgumentException();
        // no need to break here
    case 2:
        System.out.println("Oh, I got two!");
        // fall through
    case 3:
        return 3;
    default:
        System.out.println("Meh")
        // No need to break: last possible branch
}

return -1;

will return 3 even if you enter 2.

But otherwise you need to break.

share|improve this answer
3  
+1 for mentioning fall-through. – Ravi Thapliyal Jun 27 '13 at 14:13
2  
It's always a good pattern to put a break at the end of the default: since someone could add another case below it and get an unexpected fall through. – Gray Oct 17 '13 at 16:59

Using a break statement after each case should fix the problem. I would also use a default statement as well after the last case.

share|improve this answer

This is the solution. You need to use break to avoid going through each case:

switch(position)
case 0:
   textView.setText(R.string.zero);    
   break;
case 1:
   textView.setText(R.string.one);
   break;
case 2:
   textView.setText(R.string.two);  
   break;  
case 3:
   textView.setText(R.string.three);
   break;
case 4:
   textView.setText(R.string.four);    
   break;

I would recommend to read the oracle documentation about the switch statement.

share|improve this answer

You need to use break statement after eace case operations. In a switch-case statement if you dont use a break statement then all the cases after that specific one will be executed also

case 0:
   textView.setText(R.string.zero);    
   break;
share|improve this answer

Don't forget to put break; after each case: like that:

switch(position){
case 0:
   textView.setText(R.string.zero);    
   break;
case 1:
   textView.setText(R.string.one);
   break;
case 2:
   textView.setText(R.string.two);    
   break;
case 3:
   textView.setText(R.string.three);
   break;
case 4:
   textView.setText(R.string.four);  
   break;
}
share|improve this answer

In the Switch-case statements, you need to put break; after each case.

switch(position){
case 0:
   textView.setText(R.string.zero);    
   break;
case 1:
  textView.setText(R.string.one);
  break;
case 2:
  textView.setText(R.string.two);    
  break;
case 3:
  textView.setText(R.string.three);
  break;
case 4:
  textView.setText(R.string.four);  
  break;
default:
    System.out.println("not available");
}

Also you need to put default: at last, because when all case are wrong that time perform default: action.

In the switch-case statement not forgot about break; and default action.

share|improve this answer
    
It's always a good pattern to put a break at the end of the default: since someone could add another case below it and get an unexpected fall through. – Gray Oct 17 '13 at 16:59

Each break statement terminates the enclosing switch statement. Control flow continues with the first statement following the switch block. The break statements are necessary because without them, statements in switch blocks fall through: All statements after the matching case label are executed in sequence, regardless of the expression of subsequent case labels, until a break statement is encountered.

Switch is faster than if-else statement

Bottom line : Default is optional(works like else statement in switch), Break is mandatory.

Interesting fact: you won't see any compilation error, even if you forgot to place the break statement.

share|improve this answer

The switch needs a break with in each case. But in your case it could be done much simpler by defining an array as shown below.

String values = {R.string.zero, R.string.one, R.string.two, ... };

Use this to populate textView : textView.setText(values[position]);

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.