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I'm running into an issue when trying to associate two records via a belongs_to:

class Enrollment < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :offering,
    foreign_key: [:term_id, :class_number]
end

@enrollment = Enrollment.new
@enrollment.offering = Offering.last

This throws:

ActiveModel::MissingAttributeError: can't write unknown attribute `[:term_id, :class_number]'

What am I doing wrong?

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Does it work if you pass a single foreign key? (From the Rails standpoint, not from the data model standpoint.) –  Dave Newton Jun 27 '13 at 14:25
    
Yes, supplying a single key works but unfortunately I need two keys (I don't have control over the tables). –  kyledecot Jun 27 '13 at 14:28
2  
That post from pivotal_labs might help pivotallabs.com/rails-associations-with-multiple-foreign-keys they use the conditions part of association definition for the second column –  yannick Jun 27 '13 at 14:31
    
Yeah; I don't think Rails will automagically use multiple foreign keys, which is what the error message hints at. –  Dave Newton Jun 27 '13 at 14:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Rails unfortunately does not support composite keys. If you need something like this, you'd better go with a custom :has_many like @yannick's comment cites.

On the other side, you could do it with a model that's backed by a view, using a table (say my_offerings) which has a rails-friendly ID, and the two PK columns from the other table (term_id, class_number) and join it with the other table in code.

Then, have a small process that parses the offerings table, and builds any missing my_offering record.

In the end the view will have an ID, and the join in the view (that's transparent for rails) will deal with the composite key.

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