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Using css, when text has 'text-decoration:underline;' applied, is it possible to increase the distance between the text and the underline?

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This is not exactly what you were asking for, but it was an interesting read on the subject: CSS Design: Custom Underlines –  Peter Rowell Nov 14 '09 at 15:53
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4 Answers 4

up vote 74 down vote accepted

No, but you could go with something like border-bottom: 1px solid #000 and padding-bottom: 3px.

edit: if you want the same color of the "underline" (which in my example is a border), you just leave out the color declaration, i.e. border-bottom-width: 1px and border-bottom-style: solid.

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My only problem with this trick is when I am using line-height equal to the div height and then vertical-align: middle; to get it centered, then i can't use this trick because then the underline ends up below the div. –  deweydb Nov 16 '12 at 23:55
    
@deweydb: How about adding the padding-bottom to the container div as well? jsfiddle.net/dYfjc/1 –  chelmertz Nov 17 '12 at 15:32
    
+1 I didn't know about leaving off the color property to inherit the font's color - that'll save much sweat and tears in future! –  Larry Jul 8 '13 at 12:52
    
Doesn't work for multi-line links :( –  Shedal Jan 12 at 19:59
    
5 years later this is still useful! +1 for a sweet workaround –  Timmy Jan 25 at 22:39
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The problem with using border-bottom directly is that even with padding-bottom: 0, the underline tends to be too far away from the text to look good. So we still don't have complete control.

One solution that gives you pixel accuracy is to use the :after pseudo element:

a {
    text-decoration: none;
    position: relative;
}
a:after {
    content: '';

    width: 100%;
    position: absolute;
    left: 0;
    bottom: 1px;

    border-width: 0 0 1px;
    border-style: solid;
}

By changing the bottom property (negative numbers are fine) you can position the underline exactly where you want it.

One problem with this technique to beware is that it behaves a bit weird with line wraps.

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1  
This is a great answer. –  Matt Parkins Nov 9 '12 at 15:52
2  
This won't work for my particular issue, but this is a fantastic trick. +1 –  Llepwryd Jan 15 '13 at 18:32
    
Thank you, this is a wonderful answer. Perfect. –  superpuccio Apr 22 '13 at 12:58
1  
Good work around, but this will not work for anchors that span multiple lines –  Willster May 13 '13 at 15:53
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@last-child's answer is a great answer!

However, adding a border to my H2 produced an underline longer than the text.

If you're dynamically writing your CSS, or if like me you're lucky and know what the text will be, you can do the following:

  1. change the content to something the right length (ie the same

  2. text) set the font color to transparent (or rgba(0,0,0,0) )

to underline <h2>Processing</h2> (for example), change last-child's code to be:

a {
    text-decoration: none;
    position: relative;
}
a:after {
    content: 'Processing';
    color: transparent;

    width: 100%;
    position: absolute;
    left: 0;
    bottom: 1px;

    border-width: 0 0 1px;
    border-style: solid;
}
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H2s are block elements which might explain why the underline was longer than the text. Maybe display: inline-block would fix it. Replacing the text with content looks like a hack that could break in many ways. –  last-child Jun 17 '13 at 10:54
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I know it's an old question, but for single line text setting display: inline-block and then setting the height has worked well for me to control the distance between a border and the text.

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