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I'd like to raise an exception when I call an instance method on a child but the child hasn't defined it yet. Given the code:

class Parent
  def foo
    'hihi'
  end
end

class Child < Parent
end

Is it possible to call Child.new.foo in a different way that would raise this exception?

I understand I can

class Parent
  def foo
    unless self.class.instance_methods(false).include? :foo
      raise Exception.new("Child didn't define foo!")
    end
    'hihi'
  end
end

I'm wondering if it's possible to do it without this and where I would actually perform the Child.new.foo call.

Thanks!

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1  
You could extract that check to a DSL method. –  Sergio Tulentsev Jun 27 '13 at 15:26
    
What is your use case? This seems like a lot of overhead with no direct benefit. –  Aaron K Jun 27 '13 at 16:28
    
by the way, you should absolutely use raise "Child didn't define foo!" (it's a RuntimeError), never, ever raise instances of base Exception –  rewritten Jun 27 '13 at 16:31
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Do you need that plain Parent instances succeed in responding to foo?

If you are trying to make an abstract method, just raise an exception in Parent#foo and avoid calling super in any of the subclasses' foo.

class Parent
  def foo
    raise "abstract Parent#foo"
  end
end

class Child < Parent
  # this will raise an exception
end

class OtherChild < Parent
  # this won't raise an exception
  def foo
    'blah'
  end
end

On the other side, you can use method inspection like this

class Parent
  def foo
    if self.class.instance_method(:foo).owner == Parent
      raise "abstract" unless self.instance_of? Parent
    end
    "fifi"
  end
end

class Child < Parent
  # this will raise an exception
end

class OtherChild < Parent
  # this won't raise an exception
  def foo
    'blah'
    super
  end
end

This has the property that any intermediate class defining the method will block the exception.

If you want to force every subclass to define the method (not just that there is some intermediate definition), you might use

if self.class.instance_method(:foo).owner != self.class

as the condition

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He could also just remove the definition of foo from the parent class. –  David Grayson Jun 27 '13 at 15:33
    
But then the call would go up in the ancestor list, and maybe some module at some point has that same method defined, or a custom method_missing... –  rewritten Jun 27 '13 at 15:34
    
@rewritten yeah Parent.new.foo still needs to be able to be called specifically Child.new.foo will call super at some point, which is why I have that particular raise exception built already. –  nitsujri Jun 27 '13 at 15:45
    
Then your solution won't work for instance in the case of GrandChild < Child < Parent inheritance, when Child defines foo and GrandChild does not. –  rewritten Jun 27 '13 at 16:01
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Here's one way to do it: implement inherited (see Ruby docs) in the base class, and from there define the method you want to force the child class to override:

class Parent
  def self.inherited(child)
    child.send(:define_method, :foo) do
      raise "You must implement #{child}#foo!"
    end
  end

  def foo
    'hihi'
  end
end

Now any class inheriting from Parent will start off with a foo method that throws an exception. When you implement foo explicitly in the derived class, it will override this default implementation.

What I like about this approach is that it shouldn't add extra overhead to every call to foo.

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this won't work, the OP wants to call super. –  rewritten Jun 27 '13 at 16:27
    
@rewritten: Yeah, just noticed that in a comment. I may think up a way to make that work, or just delete this answer momentarily. –  Dan Tao Jun 27 '13 at 16:29
    
See my answer, you can check the value of self.class.instance_method(:foo).owner, which is the actual class that defined the called method. –  rewritten Jun 27 '13 at 16:32
    
@rewritten: I think my updated answer has an even better approach. Let me know if there's an obvious downside I'm missing. –  Dan Tao Jun 27 '13 at 16:57
    
If a grandchild defines the method and calls super, then the child would raise the RuntimeError. I don't think it's the expected behavior. –  rewritten Jun 30 '13 at 0:26
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