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I know there are tons of ways of doing JS inheritance. I am trying to do something here, where I am passing in rows into my sub class, and i want to pass it through to the super class at constructor time :

function AbstractTableModel(rows) {

    this.showRows = function() {
        alert('rows ' + this.rows);
    }
}

function SolutionTableModel(rows)  {

    this.prototype = new AbstractTableModel(rows);

    this.show = function() {
        this.protoype.showRows();
    };
}

var stm = new SolutionTableModel(3);

stm.show();

fiddle :

http://jsfiddle.net/YuqPX/2/

It doesnt seem to work because the prototype methods are not flowing down :( Any ideas?

share|improve this question
2  
this.prototype it the property prototype of the create object but you want to the one of the constructor SolutionTableModel, so you need to assign it to SolutionTableModel.prototype. –  t.niese Jun 27 '13 at 16:01
2  
Don't try to set the prototype on the instance, set it on the SolutionTableModel function. –  dystroy Jun 27 '13 at 16:01
    
dont quite understand the first comment. Can you post it as an answer? –  Oliver Watkins Jun 27 '13 at 16:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
function AbstractTableModel(rows) {
  this.rows = rows;
  this.showRows = function() {
    alert('rows ' + this.rows);
  }
}

function SolutionTableModel(rows) {
  var soln = Object.create(new AbstractTableModel(rows));
  soln.show = function() {
    this.showRows();
  };
  return soln;
}
var solution = new SolutionTableModel(5);
solution.show();

This is one way of doing the object inheritance. This method is most elegant in my opinion and can be found in detail here

Fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
like it :) it's the most java-like solution, so good for me :) –  Oliver Watkins Jun 27 '13 at 16:19
    
agree with @Braden here,elegant indeed. –  manraj82 Jun 27 '13 at 16:21
    
But this method is inefficient... you just use something like durable constructor pattern and Prototypal Inheritance, and whenever you call subtype constructor you call Object.create() method and superType constructor, and creating something like standalone object than inherit from supertype instance –  Givi Jun 27 '13 at 16:41
    
how inefficient is it? If I need to use this constructor 3 times during someone using my program, is it that much of a problem? –  Oliver Watkins Jun 28 '13 at 7:22

Live Demo

First you must define this.rows

function AbstractTableModel(rows) {
    this.rows = rows;
    this.showRows = function() {
        alert('rows ' + this.rows);
    };
}

Second, if you want to inherit from AbstractTableModel you ought to do so...

function SolutionTableModel(rows)  {
    AbstractTableModel.call(this, rows);

    this.show = function() {
        this.showRows();
    };
}

SolutionTableModel.prototype = new AbstractTableModel();

var stm = new SolutionTableModel(3);

stm.show();

/==============================================================================/

Also you can use Parasitic Combination Inheritance Pattern, if you want to avoid calling base constructor twice:

function inheritPrototype(subType, superType) {
    var prototype = Object.create(superType.prototype, {
        constructor: {
            value: subType,
            enumerable: true
        }
    });
    subType.prototype = prototype;
}

function AbstractTableModel(rows) {
    this.rows = rows;
    this.showRows = function () {
        alert('rows ' + this.rows);
    };
}

function SolutionTableModel(rows) {
    AbstractTableModel.call(this, rows);

    this.show = function () {
        this.showRows();
    };
}

inheritPrototype(AbstractTableModel, SolutionTableModel);

var stm = new SolutionTableModel(3);

stm.show();
share|improve this answer
function AbstractTableModel(rows) {
    this.rows = rows;        
}

AbstractTableModel.prototype.showRows = function() {
    console.log('rows ' + this.rows);
}

function SolutionTableModel(rows)  {
    AbstractTableModel.call(this, rows);

    this.show = function() {
        this.showRows();
    };
}

SolutionTableModel.prototype = Object.create(AbstractTableModel.prototype);

var stm = new SolutionTableModel(3);

stm.show();
share|improve this answer

here is a working example based on what you have done DEMO:

function AbstractTableModel(rows) {
    this.showRows = function () {
        alert('rows ' + rows);
    }
}

function SolutionTableModel(rows) {
    var self = this;
    this.prototype = new AbstractTableModel(rows);
    this.show = function () {
        self.prototype.showRows();
    };
}

var stm = new SolutionTableModel(3);
stm.show();
  1. In your class AbstractTableModel there is no this.rows just use rows directly.
  2. The same catch in the second class SolutionTableModel. I prefer to define variable self that points to the created instance of the object.
  3. You miss type protoype it should be prototype
share|improve this answer

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