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I'm trying to do an instance_eval followed by a attr_accessor inside initialize, and I keep getting this: `initialize': undefined method 'attr_accessor'. Why isn't this working?

The code looks kind of like this:

class MyClass
   def initialize(*args)
      instance_eval "attr_accessor :#{sym}"
   end
end
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3 Answers 3

up vote 18 down vote accepted

You can't call attr_accessor on the instance, because attr_accessor is not defined as an instance method of MyClass. It's only available on modules and classes. I suspect you want to call attr_accessor on the instance's metaclass, like this:

class MyClass
  def initialize(varname)
    class <<self
      self
    end.class_eval do
      attr_accessor varname
    end
  end
end

o1 = MyClass.new(:foo)
o2 = MyClass.new(:bar)
o1.foo = "foo" # works
o2.bar = "bar" # works
o2.foo = "baz" # does not work
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class_eval is the same as putting it where you wrote self –  johannes Nov 14 '09 at 21:07
4  
No, it's not. class <<self; ...;end is not a closure. You wouldn't be able to access varname inside it, but you can access it in the class_eval block. –  sepp2k Nov 14 '09 at 21:14

A cleaner implementation (NB: This will add the accessor to ALL instances of the class, not just the single instance, see comments below):

class MyClass
  def initialize(varname)
    self.class.send(:attr_accessor, varname)
  end
end
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6  
This defines the accessor as an instance method of MyClass. So if you have o1 = MyClass.new(:foo) and o2 = MyClass.new(:bar) both o1 and o2 have accessors for both foo and bar, which is not the intended behavior. –  sepp2k May 25 '11 at 10:05
    
Quite right! Here have my upboats. I'll leave this answer here (with your comment) for any who may come across it. –  Rob d'Apice May 26 '11 at 7:15
    
Rob's solution looks way much cleaner. But I will stick to sepp2k's solution, having the accessors only for one instance. –  JAkk Nov 10 '12 at 3:03

Rob d'Apice has it almost right. You just need to write:

self.singleton_class.send(:attr_accessor, varname)

or

self.singleton_class.class_eval "attr_accessor :#{varname}"

or my favorite variant

self.singleton_class.class_exec do attr_accessor varname end

assuming the value of varname is a symbol

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