Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I've stumbled across an interesting problem. A site I'm working has, at the moment, three pages: login.php and welcome.php and ajax.php. They all call session_start() at the top of their code. Login.php checks the $_SESSION[] variables to see if someone is logged in; if not, it gets their name/pwd, contacts ajax.php to check the name/pwd, and logs them in by setting the appropriate $_SESSION[] vars. Welcome.php looks for the appropriate $_SESSION[] vars and displays a welcome message to the user - if they're not set, it asks the user to please login. Typical behaviour, and if used in a typical fashion it works perfectly.

However, if you bookmark login.php and welcome.php as a set of tabs (e.g., in Firefox) and then open them both at the same time, something odd happens. Perhaps because session_start() is called twice at the exact same time (checked by using error_log()), two separate sessions are created (checked with session_id()). Whichever session_start() happens to be called "last" (although same timestamp) is the session that remains. This causes trouble in the following scenario: login.php's session_start() is called before welcome.php's session_start() is called.

In this situation, the session created in login.php continues to exist in that page as long as it's not refreshed. However, when it contacts ajax.php to check name/pwd details, and ajax.php calls session_start(), it retrieves the session created by welcome.php, which has nothing whatsoever in the $_SESSION[] variable, making the whole thing fail. So if login.php calls session_start() first, I have to figure out a way to prevent welcome.php's session_start() from creating a new one. Note: The calling order is not consistent, and everything obviously works fine as long as login.php's session_start() is called last (which I can't control).

Ideally, there would be some way for the second file to notice that the first file is in the process of creating the session, so it shouldn't create it's own (but only for welcome.php).

This MUST be a problem that others have dealt with, but I have been completely unable to find any mention of it on these here interwebs. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

EDIT1: Here are the files needed to reproduce the problem:

LOGIN.PHP

<?php
session_start();
error_log("login.php, session id: ".session_id());
$_SESSION['user'] = "EleventyOne"
?>
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<meta charset='utf-8'>
<title>multiple session bug - login</title>

<script src='jquery-1.9.1.js'></script>
<script>

    $(document).ready(function() {
        $.ajax({
                url : 'ajax.php',
                data : { 'func' : 'check_login' },
                dataType : 'json',
                type : 'GET',
                timeout : 10000
            })
        .done(function(data,textStatus,jqXHR){
            alert("Done: "+data.status);
        })
        .fail(function(jqXHR,textStatus,errorThrown) {                    
            alert("Failed: " + textStatus + "(" + errorThrown + ")");
        });
    }); // end ready

</script>
</head>

<body>
</body>
</html>

WELCOME.PHP:

<?php
session_start();
error_log("welcome.php, session id: ".session_id());
$message = "";

if ( isset($_SESSION['user']) ) {
    $message = "Hello, ".$_SESSION['user'];
}
else {
    $message = "Please login!";
}
?>

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<meta charset='utf-8'>
<title>multiple session bug - welcome</title>
</head>

<body>
<div>
<?php echo $message; ?>
</div>
</body>
</html>

AJAX.PHP:

<?php
session_start();
error_log("ajax.php, session id: ".session_id());

// ignoring $_GET[] here, as superfluous to the point...

if ( isset($_SESSION['user']) ) {

    // check the database for that user...
    // ...

    // return status
    $ret['status'] = "ok";
    echo json_encode($ret);
    exit;
}
else {
    // return failed status
    $ret['status'] = "broken session";
    echo json_encode($ret);
    exit;
}
?>

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<meta charset='utf-8'>
<title>multiple session bug - ajax</title>

<script src='_js/jquery-1.9.1.js'></script>
<script>

    $(document).ready(function() {
    }); // end ready

</script>
</head>

<body>
</body>
</html>

If you load login.php, open a new tab and load welcome.php, here's the error_log file you get (everything is fine):

[27-Jun-2013 18:39:40 UTC] login.php, session id: skofpr8g0tg81aqohnkahv3vk5
[27-Jun-2013 18:39:40 UTC] ajax.php, session id: skofpr8g0tg81aqohnkahv3vk5
[27-Jun-2013 18:39:44 UTC] welcome.php, session id: skofpr8g0tg81aqohnkahv3vk5

If you bookmark login.php and welcome.php as a set of tabs, close your browser, re-open it, and open both tabs at the same time, you will get one of two error_log files, depending on which session_start is called first.

This one works, as login.php's session_start() persists for ajax.php. So ajax.php reports status of "ok":

[27-Jun-2013 18:40:39 UTC] welcome.php, session id: 6q2q96lhhoaqqhj214gs3gos36
[27-Jun-2013 18:40:39 UTC] login.php, session id: j8eaa5mtfsla9q3q80qt03kvt7
[27-Jun-2013 18:40:39 UTC] ajax.php, session id: j8eaa5mtfsla9q3q80qt03kvt7

This one doesn't work, as welcome.php's session_start() persists for ajax.php, so ajax.php reports "broken session":

[27-Jun-2013 18:40:18 UTC] login.php, session id: s4b7jo41jpg1ubbe8at7c5qr35
[27-Jun-2013 18:40:18 UTC] welcome.php, session id: freu86sn3edc3fuoc2pn875o90
[27-Jun-2013 18:40:18 UTC] ajax.php, session id: freu86sn3edc3fuoc2pn875o90
share|improve this question
    
Does login.php depend on some session store prepopulation and subsequently fail with the newer session, or does welcome.php interfere? –  mario Jun 27 '13 at 17:59
    
I'm sorry mario, but I don't understand what you're asking. Login.php can continue to use it's $_SESSION[] data without a problem, as long as it's not refreshed. However, every other page that calls session_start() gets the session created by welcome.php, not login.php (assuming login.php's session_start() was executed first). –  EleventyOne Jun 27 '13 at 18:13
    
How does the problem materialize in the user interface? Doesn't login.php require a second form submission before actually registering a user id? Because then it's pretty irrelevant if it's using its original session, or any one of the subsequent/later session ids. –  mario Jun 27 '13 at 18:18
    
I just added the files needed to reproduce the problem. Hopefully this should clear up any ambiguities about the situation. –  EleventyOne Jun 27 '13 at 18:50
    
Well, 2 tabs opened before the first one returns, and no cookies before that, will indeed start 2 sessions, last one (last cookie set/altered) wins. However, why is $_SESSION['user'] only checked/set in login.php? Shouldn't there be some bootstrap code that always checks it, regardless of 'actual' pages or ajax requests coming in? if(!isset($_SESSION['user'])){ ..do some logic you want..} What if people only request welcome.php now, they won't have a user entry either? –  Wrikken Jun 27 '13 at 19:09

2 Answers 2

I doubt one process if overwriting the other. Only one process can have the same session file open at any time. The 2nd (and subsequent) will hang waiting for the session file to become available.

From my experience, $_SESSION isn't really as magical as it seems, it just uses browser cookies or something to make sure reads from and writes to the same file on disk every time. I got around this problem previously by only using session_start() when I needed. In other words, instead of opening the session at the top of every page, I did a session_start immediately before writing or retrieving information from $_SESSION and did a session_write_close as soon as I was done with it.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Derek. I'm not too familiar with how sessions operate at the disk level, but it doesn't seem to be "overwriting" anything, simply creating different sessions. And as far as I can tell, every post on here dealing with session_start() recommends that it's called on the top of the page, so that seems quite standard. One possible solution might be to force a delay of 0.5 seconds on every page other than login.php, but that seems like a weak choice. –  EleventyOne Jun 27 '13 at 18:12
    
Then make sure you're calling session_write_close when you're done with the session. Even if your script goes on to bigger and better things. –  Derek Jun 27 '13 at 18:13
    
That appears to have no effect. Which, I suppose, makes sense, since multiple sessions are created at the call to session_start() which are called within the same second. Anything I do after calling session_start() in login.php does not appear to affect the call to session_start() in welcome.php, since it will have executed before login.php gets to any session_write_close() call. –  EleventyOne Jun 27 '13 at 18:17
    
Without understanding more about what's going on, I can't be of much more help, sorry. You can force login to destroy/unset session information to make sure it is the one to "create" the session if welcome is winning the race condition. Check out this function list for more info: php.net/manual/en/ref.session.php –  Derek Jun 27 '13 at 18:18
    
It's quite easy to reproduce, perhaps I'll update the original question with file listings to reproduce it. Nevertheless, the problem only happens when welcome.php is losing the race condition, not winning it. –  EleventyOne Jun 27 '13 at 18:20
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The best solution I could come up with was to move the session "creation" (i.e., setting session variables) into the ajax.php file, executed only after a user has successfully sent their uname/pwd and so they are about to be redirected to a new page anyway (i.e., welcome.php). This means that login.php cannot be guaranteed to have access to any session variables set by ajax.php whatsoever, so it's just a dumb page that relies solely on its ajax calls to know what's going on. As it turns out, this isn't such a hassle after all.

share|improve this answer
1  
This really isn't the best solution. As you develop further you will find the need to share data across all of your files, which will include, but not limited to; session handling. What I would suggest is create a "bootstrap" file which will initialize all global settings. This can be a file which is required by all other files using a concrete require_once, loaded in an autoloader, or if you opt to follow the Model, View, Controller (MVC) pattern, can be in the controller file. –  Mike Purcell Aug 11 '13 at 1:38
    
@MikePurcell Thanks for your comment. I have a central singleton that is included in all of my files (with require_once). That singleton, among other things, deals with session handling. However, that did not prevent the original problem from occurring (as mentioned in response to Wrikken above... I linked to an external 'bootstrap' example that would have the same problem). Nevertheless, I don't understand how autoloading works (it's on my list to learn), so perhaps that would solve the problem. I'll put an extra star beside it :) –  EleventyOne Aug 11 '13 at 3:46
    
After looking at this again, it seems that this problem is unavoidable no matter what 'boostrapping' approach you use. The issue is that two separate .php files, in two separate tabs, are being loaded at the same time. Assuming they both have a require_once to the bootstrap file, they will both include it, and if session_start() is in there it will be executed twice, at the same time, causing the problem seen here. As far as I can tell, the solution that I've implemented is the only way to deal with it. –  EleventyOne Aug 18 '13 at 18:24
1  
Finally, after learning how __autoload works, I can confirm that my solution, out of those suggested (as I understand them), is the only one that solves the problem. Two files (one per tab) are loaded simultaneously, regardless of the include/bootstrap/autoload approach, eventually session_start() is called for each file, at the same time, which causes the problem. Hence the given solution. –  EleventyOne Aug 22 '13 at 4:20
    
@MikePurcell If you still think that this is not the best solution, I would be very interested in reading a detailed answer that was the right solution. Genuinely. I've been thinking about this for months now and, as I have explained here, I simply cannot see another way around it :( –  EleventyOne Oct 12 '13 at 2:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.