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I am rather new to Perl and am trying to combine several .pm files into a single script. Most of the modules copy over just fine, but some have an error where the end of file is reached, but the script keeps printing. Here is an example of the code:

$copy_line = 0;
sysopen(FILE, $file_path, O_WRONLY | O_CREAT, 0711);
sysopen(MODULE, $module_path, O_RDONLY | O_EXCL);

while(<MODULE>)
{
  my $line = $_;
  if(($line ne "# START\n") and ($copy_line eq 0))
  {
  }
  else
  {
    print FILE "$line";
    $copy_line = 1;
  }
}

close FILE;
close MODULE;

Each module has start and end tags to I do not copy any use statements, and so I know when to stop copying. An example of the module is

#!/usr/bin/perl
# START
some code to copy over
some more code to copy
even more code to copy
# END

What happens in some files is I see the end tag, followed by repeated code from the module. The output looks something like

# START
some code to copy over
some more code to copy
even more code to copy
# END
code to copy
even more code to copy
# END

What might be causing this? Thanks,

-rusty

share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by Toto, Flimzy, vonbrand, David Pope, lpapp Mar 17 '14 at 3:24

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Why is half of your conditional commented out? And is there a reason why you're using sysopen instead of open? –  friedo Jun 27 '13 at 18:09
    
@friedo Some code was commented out because I mistyped. That has been fixed. And I am using sysopen because that is what I found when I was looking for how to open a file, and create it if necessary (not existing) –  bc rusty Jun 27 '13 at 18:52
    
Perl Modules are supposed to be called, not mashed together. –  vonbrand Mar 17 '14 at 1:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are various things wrong with your script:

  • You didn't show the whole script; constants like O_WRONLY don't exist by default.

  • Therefore it may be that you didn't use strict; use warnings; at the beginning of your script. This is neccessary to get warned about errors or possible mistakes.

  • The strict mode requires you to declare all your variables. You can do so with the my keyword, e.g. my $copy_line = 0.

  • Never use sysopen, except when you fully understand how open works and why it wouldn't be the best choice for a given situation. Considering that I don't have that level of knowledge, I think we'll stick to the normal open.

    The open takes a variable, a mode, and a filename, like

    open my $file, "<", $filename;
    

    I encourage you to use autodie for automatic error handling, otherwise you should do

    open my $file, "<", $filename or die "Can't open $filename: $!";
    

    where $! contains the reason for the error. You can specify various modes for open, which are modelled after shell redirection operators. Important are: < read, > write (or create), >> append, |- write pipe to command, -| read pipe from command.

  • The eq operator tests for string equality. If you want to test for numeric equality, use the == operator.

  • if (COND) {} else { STUFF } could rather be written unless (COND) {STUFF}.

  • You have successfully implemented some twisted logic that starts copying at the START marker. However, you don't stop at the END. For stuff like this, the flip-flop-operator .. can be used: It takes two operands, which are arbitrary expressions. The operator returns false until the first operand is true, and remains true until after the second operand returned true. If one operand is a constant integer, it is interpreted as a line number. Thus, the script

    while (<>) {
      print if 5 .. 10;
    }
    

    prints lines number 5–10 inclusive of the input.

    For your problem, you should probably use regexes that match the start and the end marker:

    while (<>) {
      print if /^ \s* # \s* START/x .. /^ \s* # \s* END/x
    }
    

    I'll assume here that you know regexes, but I can add explanations if needed.

    If the readline operator <> is used without an operand, it takes the command line arguments of the script, opens them, and reads them in sequence. If no arguments were provided, it uses STDIN.

    This allows for flexible little scripts. The code can be summarized in the command-line oneliner

    $ perl -ne'print if /^\s*#\s*START/../^\s*#\s*END/' INPUT-FILE1 INPUT-FILE2 >OUTPUT
    

    There are two issues with this:

    1. It prints out the start/end markers as well
    2. If a file doesn't contain an # END, the next files will be printed out in full until the next # END is found.

    We can mitigate issue #2 by testing for the end of file in the termination condition:

    print if /^\s*#\s*START/ .. (/^\s*#\s*END/ or eof);
    

    Issue #1 is slightly more complex; I'd reintroduce a flag for that:

    my $print_this = 0;
    
    while (<>) {
      if (/^\s*#\s*END/ or eof) {
          $print_this = 0;
      } elsif ($print_this) {
          print;
      } elsif (/^\s*#\s*START/) {
          $print_this = 1;
      }
    }
    

    Partial test case:

    $ perl -e'
      my $print_this = 0;
      while (<>) {
        if    (/^\s*#\s*END/ or eof) { $print_this = 0 }
        elsif ($print_this)          { print           }
        elsif (/^\s*#\s*START/)      { $print_this = 1 }
      }' <<'__END__'
    no a 1
    no a 2
      # START
    yes b 1
    yes b 2
    yes b 3
    #END
    no c 1
    no c 2
    # START
    yes d 1
     #    END
    no e 1
    __END__
    

    Output:

    yes b 1
    yes b 2
    yes b 3
    yes d 1
    
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. As you mentioned, I had several things wrong. The fixes were changing the eq to == for integers, and checking for # END. I originally thought I wouldn't have to because of EOF, but it turned out to not be the case. –  bc rusty Jun 27 '13 at 20:41

If you're copying files without modifying their contents, you should look into File::Copy http://perldoc.perl.org/File/Copy.html

File::Copy is a standard module and is installed along with Perl. For a list of standard modules, see perldoc perlmodlib http://perldoc.perl.org/perlmodlib.html#Standard-Modules

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is that some of the files have use or require at the top, and I do not want those in the merged script –  bc rusty Jun 27 '13 at 18:16

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