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(first paragraph is not that important)

I am using the subst command to map a directory to a drive on my computer. If I run my program without administrator rights then everything works fine. The problem that I have is that I need to run my console application as an administrator. Doing that causes the subst command not to work. In other words the desktop will not be able to see the drive only the administrator.

So I am confused in the sense as: The desktop is being run from what session/account? If I run a program as an administrator I will not be able to drag files from windows explorer to it and the reason I am assuming is because the program is being run from a different user account?

Researching on the internet I came accros the method: (see link)

Process.Start(path + "HelloWorld.exe", args, uname, password, domain);

which that method will enable me to start a specific process as a specific user I belive.

If I am running a program as an administrator and will like to start a process as a non administrator so that the current user can access the virtual drive that I am mounting then what will be the username, domain, and password? I just have one user account under this computer. how many user accounts there are?

For example I have a program called window.exe located on my desktop that it just shows a messagebox. If I run it without admin priviledges I get: enter image description here

If I run that same program as an administrator (right click run as admin) then windows task manager says is being run by the same user tono and not the administrator.

In short I just want to run a program with non admin priviledges from a program that has admin priviledges. Its just that meanwhile trying to solve this problem I have encountered all this questions.

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