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I want to identify each element by it's name attribute. Each element has the same class and will ultimately contain differing dynamic information.

For example I would want the following code to alert the individual element's name value:

html:

<p class="pexample" name="0">this is p #1</p>
<p class="pexample" name="1">this is p #2</p>
<p class="pexample" name="2">this is p #3</p>

jquery:

$('p').on('click', function() {
    if ($('p').attr('name') !== undefined) {
        alert($('p').attr('name'));
    }
})

Here is a jsfiddle.. http://jsfiddle.net/XG7nd/1/

This code however only alerts the initial elements name value. Help is greatly appreciated.

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marked as duplicate by Kevin B, Code Lღver, Roman C, Pere Villega, Mohammad Adil Jun 28 '13 at 9:56

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
I think you want if ($(this).attr('name') instead of $('p'). The latter selects all the p elements on the page... –  crush Jun 27 '13 at 19:22

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This should do:

$('p').on('click', function() {
   var name = $(this).attr('name');// `this` here refers to the current p you clicked on
   if (name ) {
        alert(name); 
    }
})

While doing $('p').attr('name') this will always give you the name of the first item in the collection.

Demo

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Try this:

$(document).on('click','p', function() {
    alert($(this).attr('name'));
});

DEMO

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If statement isn't accurate. It should also use this. –  crush Jun 27 '13 at 19:24

You want to use $(this)

$('p').on('click', function() {
    if($(this).attr('name') !== 'undefined') {
        alert($(this).attr('name'));
    }
});
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This is occurring because you are getting the name attribute for the first <p> on every click. You need to specify the one that the event originated from:

$('p').on('click', function() {
if ($(this).attr('name') !== undefined) {
    alert($(this).attr('name'));
}
})

Note, jQuery selectors return an array of matching elements. You must use the this keyword to get a handle on the element in the current context.

FIDDLE

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Explanation

You keep looking for the p element even on click, so it'll select the first one it finds.

What your code says:

When p is clicked:

  • Find a p element and alert its attribute.

What you really want:

When p is clicked:

  • alert the clicked element's attribute

Solution

Select the attribute of this, which is the clicked element.

JSFiddle

JavaScript

$('p').on('click', function() {
    if ($(this).attr('name') !== undefined) {
        alert($(this).attr('name'));
    }
})

Read more about the this keyword.

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