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I currently use the following query to get data grouped by day:

SELECT DATE(from_unixtime(timestampcolumn)) as date, COUNT(*)
FROM db.table
WHERE timestampcolumn BETWEEN :startTime AND :endTime
GROUP BY DATE(from_unixtime(timestampcolumn))
ORDER BY timestampcolumn

The DATE() function returns the string YYYY-MM-DD, so the above query is simple and works great for getting data grouped by each day, but how can I modify it to return data grouped by each week?


In response to Jonathan's answer:

I tried making an example in SQL Fiddle, but the DATE() SQL function does not work in SQL Fiddle for some reason (it simply doesn't work in SQL Fiddle, but it does on both my live and wamp servers).

So here's an example you can try out if you'd like:

SETUP:

CREATE TABLE example(id INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, PRIMARY KEY(id), timestamp INT, data INT);

INSERT INTO example (timestamp, data) VALUES (1355400000, 1);

INSERT INTO example (timestamp, data) VALUES (1355659200, 1);

INSERT INTO example (timestamp, data) VALUES (1357694861, 1);

INSERT INTO example (timestamp, data) VALUES (1355918400, 1);

INSERT INTO example (timestamp, data) VALUES (1356955200, 1);

INSERT INTO example (timestamp, data) VALUES (1358510400, 1);

INSERT INTO example (timestamp, data) VALUES (1358769600, 1);

INSERT INTO example (timestamp, data) VALUES (1358769600, 1);

INSERT INTO example (timestamp, data) VALUES (1371824368, 1);

INSERT INTO example (timestamp, data) VALUES (1371833476, 1);

INSERT INTO example (timestamp, data) VALUES (1371840324, 1);

INSERT INTO example (timestamp, data) VALUES (1371850523, 1);

INSERT INTO example (timestamp, data) VALUES (1371863191, 1);

INSERT INTO example (timestamp, data) VALUES (1371865401, 1);

INSERT INTO example (timestamp, data) VALUES (1371872379, 1);

INSERT INTO example (timestamp, data) VALUES (1372006190, 1);

INSERT INTO example (timestamp, data) VALUES (1372051945, 1);

INSERT INTO example (timestamp, data) VALUES (1372189402, 1);

INSERT INTO example (timestamp, data) VALUES (1372207830, 1);

INSERT INTO example (timestamp, data) VALUES (1372229733, 1);

INSERT INTO example (timestamp, data) VALUES (1372350338, 1);

INSERT INTO example (timestamp, data) VALUES (1372358259, 1);

QUERY:

SELECT DATE(from_unixtime(timestamp)) as date, COUNT(*)
FROM example
WHERE timestamp BETWEEN 0 AND 9999999999999999999999999999999
GROUP BY DATE(from_unixtime(timestamp))
ORDER BY timestamp

OUTPUT:

2012-12-13  1
2012-12-16  1
2012-12-19  1
2012-12-31  1
2013-01-08  1
2013-01-18  1
2013-01-21  2
2013-06-21  7
2013-06-23  1
2013-06-24  1
2013-06-25  2
2013-06-26  1
2013-06-27  2

Now, dividing the time stamp by (7 * 24 * 3600).

QUERY:

SELECT DATE(from_unixtime(timestamp / (7 * 24 * 3600))) as date, COUNT(*)
FROM example
WHERE timestamp BETWEEN 0 AND 9999999999999999999999999999999
GROUP BY DATE(from_unixtime(timestamp / (7 * 24 * 3600)))
ORDER BY timestamp

OUTPUT:

1969-12-31  22
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

One basic idea should be to group by the integer value of the time stamp divided by the number of seconds in a week: timestampcolumn / (7 * 24 * 3600)

You then need to consider edge effects and time zones:

  • Was 1970-01-01 on the appropriate day of the week (it was a Thursday, so probably not).
  • When exactly does the week start for your given data; is it affected by winter and summer time (standard and daylight saving time)?

You can deal with those by adding appropriate values to the time stamp column before dividing. One final twist: some systems might compensate for leap seconds. POSIX doesn't. You'll have to decide whether that matters to you.

Another option to consider is whether there is a way to format the date as a week value (e.g. ISO 8601 notation such as 2013-W23 for week 23 of 2013). You can then simply group by that string.


This is what I meant:

SELECT timestamp / (7 * 24 * 3600) AS weekno, COUNT(*)
  FROM example
 WHERE timestamp BETWEEN 0 AND 9999999999999999999999999999999
 GROUP BY timestamp / (7 * 24 * 3600)
 ORDER BY weekno

You might be able to use GROUP BY weekno, or you might have to ORDER BY timestamp / (7 * 24 * 3600), but you manufacture the week number. If you need to produce a date too, then you use:

SELECT timestamp / (7 * 24 * 3600) AS weekno,
       DATE(FROM_UNIXTIME((7 * 24 * 3600) * INT(timestamp / (7 * 24 * 3600))))) AS weekstart,
       COUNT(*)
  FROM example
 WHERE timestamp BETWEEN 0 AND 9999999999999999999999999999999
 GROUP BY timestamp / (7 * 24 * 3600)
 ORDER BY weekno

You could probably also use MIN(DATE(FROM_UNIXTIME(timestamp))) for weekstart, unless you think the first day of the week won't always be represented in the data.

share|improve this answer
    
What you said makes sense and it seems like it should work, but when I tried doing it only one row is returned 1969-12-31 299 . 299 is the number of rows in the table, so it appears to be grouping everything together instead of by week. All I modified was the inside of the from_unixtime functions, which I replaced with what you came up with. Any ideas? –  Nate Jun 28 '13 at 0:03
    
What is the type of timestampcolumn in your database? Isn't it a Unix time in (integer) number of seconds since The Epoch (1970-01-01 00:00:00 +00:00)? So, you don't need to apply from_unixtime() to it...What does from_unixtime() return, anyway? It returns a formatted representation of the time. So, you divided a string by a big number (604800) and got 0 — which is about right. Do the arithmetic on timestampcolumn (assuming it is an integer Unix timestamp) directly. The result of the division is not a DATE or TIME value per se; it is more or less a 'week number since 1970-01-01'. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 28 '13 at 0:33
    
Yes, timestampcolumn is an integer. from_unixtime() converts the timestamp to YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS and then DATE() extracts YYYY-MM-DD' from that. I divided the integer value (timestampcolumn) by 7*24*3600`, not a string. As I mentioned, it really seems like it should have worked, but it didn't. I'm going to try to create an example and post it. –  Nate Jun 28 '13 at 1:46
    
I updated my question with an example. Hopefully I'm just making a silly mistake! –  Nate Jun 28 '13 at 2:14
    
Sort of — you misunderstood what I was trying to explain, anyway, but my answer may have been too cryptic. I've updated it to outline what I intended. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 28 '13 at 3:46

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