Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am working with an existing web app, in the app there are a variety of submit buttons on different forms, some using regular http post, some defining an onClick function, and some binding a js event handler to the button using a class on the element.

What I want to do, is bind another event handler to these buttons by just adding a class to the buttons, but what I want to determine is will the new event handler be guaranteed to be executed, or could one of the form submit actions happen before it does meaning my new function isn't hit.

The example scenario is I want to add a class to these buttons that bimds them all to a common js function that simply logs usage to some api. Is there a risk that the logging function isn't called because the form submit has navigated away from the page?

I've not done loads of js development, and I could test this 100 times over and just get lucky with it firing.


Below is some code I have tested with for one of the examples - again, I'm not asking how to bind multiple events, the question is to about my understanding of the spec and whether execution of all handlers is guaranteed.

$(document).ready(function(){
    $('.testingBtn').click(function() {
        window.location.replace("http://stackoverflow.com");
    });
    $( ".testingBtn" ).click(function(){
        alert('submitting!');
    });
});


<input class="testingBtn" type="submit" id="submitform" value="Complete Signup" />

As seen above, I can bind the multiple events, and in this example, just directed to another url, but this could be a form.submit() etc. In my testing the alert has always fired first, but am I just getting lucky with the race conditions?

share|improve this question
    
Are you using jQuery, or other DOM and event library? Because this is a case most of those libraries cover with extreme elegance. –  Alex Wayne Jun 27 '13 at 20:01
    
Yep query, although if there is a more suited lib would be happy to hear about them. –  rhinds Jun 27 '13 at 20:04
    
query? Do you mean jQuery? –  Alex Wayne Jun 27 '13 at 20:04
    
Yes, sorry. On mobile. –  rhinds Jun 27 '13 at 20:05
    
@EliasVanOotegem I was on my mobile, so couldn't easily add code - will add some to the question now, however, I feel your comment is a little unfair - My question isn't about how to do something, its to clarify or correct my understanding of some js concepts (e.g. are multiple event handlers guaranteed to complete, even if one is navigating away from the page). I have tried this, and in my experiments they have completed - but if race conditions are involved, then as mentioned, I could run the test 1000 times and get lucky, and it only takes one fail to prove otherwise –  rhinds Jun 27 '13 at 20:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

In JS, you don't really have control over what order the event handlers are called, but with carful delegation and well-placed listeners, it is possible.

Delegation is one of the most powerful features of the event model. As you may or may not know: in JS, an event is handed to the top of the dom, from where it propagates down to the element onto which the event should be applied. It stands to reason, therefore, that an event listener attached to the global object will call its handler prior to a listener that has been attached to the element itself.

window.addEventListener('click',function(e)
{
    e = e || window.event;
    var target = e.target || e.srcElement;
    console.log('window noticed you clicked something');
    console.log(target);//<-- this is the element that was clicked
}, false);//<-- we'll get to the false in a minute

It's important to note we actually have access to the event object in the handlers. In this case, we left the event object untouched, so it'll just continue to propagate down to the target, on its way down, it might meet with something like this:

document.getElementById('container').addEventListener('click', function(e)
{
    e = e || window.event;
    var target = e.target || e.srcElement;
    if (target.tagName.toLowerCase() !== 'a' || target.className.match(/\bclickable\b/))
    {
        return e;//<return the event, unharmed
    }
    e.returnValue = false;
    if (e.preventDefault)
    {
        e.preventDefault();
    }
}, false);

Now, this handler will be called after the listener @window level calls its helper. This time, the event is changed if the clicked element didn't have the clickable class, or the element is a link. The event is canceled, but it lives on, still. The event is still free to propagate further down the dom, so we might encounter something like:

document.getElmentById('form3').addEventListener('click',function(e)
{
     e = e || window.event;
     if (e.returnValue === false || e.isDefaultPrevented)
     {//this event has been changed already
         //do stuff, like validation or something, then you could:
         e.cancelBubble = true;
         if (e.stopPropagation)
         {
             e.stopPropagation();
         }
     }
}, false);

Here, by calling stopPropagation, the event is killed of: it can't propagate further down the dom to its target, but only if the event was already altered, if not, the event object travels further down the DOM, as if nothing happened.
Once it reaches its target node, the event enters its second phase: the bubble phase. Instead of propagating down into the deeps of the DOM, it climbs back up, to the top level (all the way to the global object, where it was dispatched... from whence it came and all that).

In the bubble phase, all the same rules apply as in the propagation phase, only the other way around. The event object will encounter the elements that are closest to the target element first, and the global object last.

There's a lot of handy, and clear diagrams for this here. I can't put it any better than good 'ol quirksmode, so I suggest you read what they have to say there.

Bottom line: when dealing with 2 event listeners, attach them both on a different level to sort-of queue them the way you like.
If you want to guarantee both are called, only stop the event from propagating in that handler that will be called last.
When you've got two listeners, attached to the same element/object for the same event, I've never come across a situation where the listener that was attached first, wasn't also called first.

That's it, I'm off to bed, hoping I made sense

share|improve this answer

jQuery makes this easy.

$(document).on('click', '.someclass', function() {
  doStuff();
});

$(document).on('click', '.someclass', function() {
  doMoreStuff();
});

Handlers then both will fire on click. jQuery keeps a queue of handers for you. And handles document clicks that match a selector of your choice so that they can be triggered no matter when your buttons are created.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Alex - so does js guarantee that both doStuff() and doMoreStuff() will execute to completion? even if doStuff redirects to another url will doMoreStuff() always complete before it does? (I have updated my question with an example) –  rhinds Jun 27 '13 at 20:29
    
@rhinds In most cases yes. In the case of navigating away from the page, I am not sure. Test it and find out! –  Alex Wayne Jun 27 '13 at 20:43
    
And I would add that if you have code that requires to be after you begin to navigate away from your page, I would rethink your approach... That seems like a bad idea. –  Alex Wayne Jun 27 '13 at 20:45
    
Yeah, I am thinking I might have to change tact - the only reason for hoping this will work is because I want to retrofit this logging function on to the buttons in my existing code, and just adding a class to them will be much nicer than having to update all the buttons with calls to the logging api before posting the form. –  rhinds Jun 27 '13 at 20:48

I am/was having a similar issue as this. However I can not affect the order of/delegate the pre-existing 'click' events (added by Wicket framework). But I still need to execute a new custom event before any of the 'click' or 'change' events handled by the framework.

Luckily there are several events that are actually executed in order. The 'mousedown' and the 'mouseup' happens to happen before the 'click'.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DOM_events

$(document).on('mousedown', function (event) {
  event = event || window.event
  var target = event.target || event.srcElement;
  console.log(target + ' before default event'); // Hold mouse button down to see this message in console before any action is executed
});

OR

$(document).on('mouseup', function (event) {
  event = event || window.event
  var target = event.target || event.srcElement;
  alert(target + ' before default event'); // You may not notice this event fires when the page changes unless this is an alert
});

This will allow the logging to be done (e.g. via ajax) before the actual event is executed e.g. a page change via (ajax) link.

Of course you may need to have more sophisticated means to detect for what the additional event handling should be done, but you can use for example the 'target' information for this. => This script monitors everything on the page, as this is how I need this to be done.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.