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I asked a question a little while ago (Python splitting unknown string by spaces and parentheses) which worked great until I had to change my way of thinking. I have still not grasped regex so I need some help with this.

If the user types this:

new test (test1 test2 test3) test "test5 test6"

I would like it to look like the output to the variable like this:

["new", "test", "test1 test2 test3", "test", "test5 test6"]

In other words if it is one word seperated by a space then split it from the next word, if it is in parentheses then split the whole group of words in the parentheses and remove them. Same goes for the quotation marks.

I currently am using this code which does not meet the above standard (From the answers in the link above):

>>>import re
>>>strs = "Hello (Test1 test2) (Hello1 hello2) other_stuff"
>>>[", ".join(x.split()) for x in re.split(r'[()]',strs) if x.strip()]
>>>['Hello', 'Test1, test2', 'Hello1, hello2', 'other_stuff']

This works well but there is a problem, if you have this:

strs = "Hello Test (Test1 test2) (Hello1 hello2) other_stuff"

It combines the Hello and Test as one split instead of two.

It also doesn't allow the use of parentheses and quotation marks splitting at the same time.

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2  
have a look at greedy and non-greedy matching. –  XORcist Jun 27 '13 at 20:19
    
@möter Do you have a link to lead me to a tutorial? Most everything I find are questions about it that don't really help me and I can't read the python docs to well. If that's all that's left it will have to do. –  TrevorPeyton Jun 27 '13 at 20:30
    
Sorry, I misread the question. But here's a link to the official tutorial: docs.python.org/2/library/re.html –  XORcist Jun 28 '13 at 10:04

3 Answers 3

Your problem is not well defined.

Your description of the rules is

In other words if it is one word seperated by a space then split it from the next word, if it is in parentheses then split the whole group of words in the parentheses and remove them. Same goes for the commas.

I guess with commas you mean inverted commas == quotation marks.

Then with this

strs = "Hello (Test1 test2) (Hello1 hello2) other_stuff"

you should get that

["Hello (Test1 test2) (Hello1 hello2) other_stuff"]

since everything is surrounded by inverted commas. Most probably, you want to work with no care of largest inverted commas.

I propose this, although a bot ugly

import re, itertools
strs = raw_input("enter a string list ")

print [ y for y in list(itertools.chain(*[re.split(r'\"(.*)\"', x) 
        for x in re.split(r'\((.*)\)', strs)])) 
        if y <> '']

gets

>>> 
enter a string list here there (x y ) thereagain "there there"
['here there ', 'x y ', ' thereagain ', 'there there']
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Yes, sorry about the commas and quotation marks and the fact that my wording wasn't very good, it was a long night. The above code would work great except for one thing, what I tried to explain here In other words if it is one word separated by a space then split it from the next word would be the equivalent to your here there in your code and should be split into two different words 'here', 'there' instead of 'hear there'. –  TrevorPeyton Jun 28 '13 at 7:07

This is doing what you expect

import re, itertools
strs = raw_input("enter a string list ")

res1 = [ y for y in list(itertools.chain(*[re.split(r'\"(.*)\"', x) 
        for x in re.split(r'\((.*)\)', strs)])) 
        if y <> '']

set1 = re.search(r'\"(.*)\"', strs).groups()
set2 = re.search(r'\((.*)\)', strs).groups()

print [k for k in res1 if k in list(set1) or k in list(set2) ] 
   + list(itertools.chain(*[k.split() for k in res1 if k 
   not in set1 and k not in set2 ]))
share|improve this answer
    
Almost, it put's the list out of order though, if I put new word test (test1 test2) word word "test1 test2 tet3" te st the output is ['test1 test2', 'test1 test2 tet3', 'new', 'word', 'test', 'word', 'word', 'te', 'st'] which is nearly right but the new word get out of place. –  TrevorPeyton Jun 28 '13 at 7:51
    
sorry, i missed that order was in fact important –  octoback Jun 28 '13 at 8:10
    
I thought that would be a given, next time I will specify. Is there an easy fix with this code? –  TrevorPeyton Jun 28 '13 at 18:31
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The answer was simply:

re.findall('\[[^\]]*\]|\([^\)]*\)|\"[^\"]*\"|\S+',strs)
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