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I have a matrix 60 000 x 60 000 in a txt file, I need to get svd of this matrix. I use R but I don´t know if R can generate it.

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Welcome to stackoverflow. You will probably benefit from looking over the guidelines on asking a good question here: stackoverflow.com/help/how-to-ask. In particular, please include a minimal, reproducible answer, and explain what you have tried so far to solve your own problem. –  Drew Steen Jun 27 '13 at 20:49
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Probably not. n <- 60e3; x <- matrix(0, ncol=n, nrow=n) throws an error. (In R-2.15.3) –  Andrie Jun 27 '13 at 21:00
    
@Andrie: On my machine: Error: cannot allocate vector of size 13.4 Gb. So probably only a matter of having enough memory. At least on R 3.x, where we can have long arrays, I think. –  asb Jun 27 '13 at 21:14
    
@asb That's a loaded "only". It you need 13.4Gb just to create the matrix, I would think you'd need at least double that to do anything meaningful on it. Maybe triple. (Assuming there isn't a disk based solution using ff or bigmemory or something.) –  joran Jun 27 '13 at 21:21
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I think the combo bigmemory + irlba is the way to go (or scidb but I find very difficult to install it on my linux box). –  dickoa Jun 27 '13 at 21:30

2 Answers 2

I think it's possible to compute (partial) svd using the irlba package and bigmemory and bigalgebra without using a lot of memory.

First let's create a 20000 * 20000 matrix and save it into a file

require(bigmemory)
require(bigalgebra)
require(irlba)

con <- file("mat.txt", open = "a")
replicate(20, {
    x <- matrix(rnorm(1000 * 20000), nrow = 1000)
    write.table(x, file  = 'mat.txt', append = TRUE,
            row.names = FALSE, col.names = FALSE)
})

file.info("mat.txt")$size
## [1] 7.264e+09   7.3 Gb
close(con)

Then you can read this matrix using bigmemory::read.big.matrix

bigm <- read.big.matrix("mat.txt", sep = " ",
                        type = "double",
                        backingfile = "mat.bk",
                        backingpath = "/tmp",
                        descriptorfile = "mat.desc")

str(bigm)
## Formal class 'big.matrix' [package "bigmemory"] with 1 slots
##   ..@ address:<externalptr>

dim(bigm)
## [1] 20000 20000

bigm[1:3, 1:3]
##            [,1]     [,2]     [,3]
## [1,] -0.3623255 -0.58463 -0.23172
## [2,] -0.0011427  0.62771  0.73589
## [3,] -0.1440494 -0.59673 -1.66319

Now we can use the use the excellent irlba package as explained here .

The first step consist of defining matrix multiplication operator which can work with big.matrix object and then use the irlba::irlba function

matmul <- function(A, B, transpose=FALSE) {
    ## Bigalgebra requires matrix/vector arguments
    if(is.null(dim(B))) B <- cbind(B)

    if(transpose)
        return(cbind((t(B) %*% A)[]))

    cbind((A %*% B)[])
}

dim(bigm)

system.time(
S <- irlba(bigm, nu = 2, nv = 2, matmul = matmul)
)

##    user  system elapsed 
## 169.820   0.923 170.194


str(S)
## List of 5
##  $ d    : num [1:2] 283 283
##  $ u    : num [1:20000, 1:2] -0.00615 -0.00753 -0.00301 -0.00615 0.00734 ...
##  $ v    : num [1:20000, 1:2] 0.020086 0.012503 0.001065 -0.000607 -0.006009 ...
##  $ iter : num 10
##  $ mprod: num 310

I forgot to set the seed to make it reproductible but I just wanted to show that it's possible to do that in R.

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+1 for showing a method, looks great... BUT... what about 60e3*60e3? That's 9 times the data. I wonder what the BigO is on this problem? Any ideas? :-) –  Simon O'Hanlon Jun 27 '13 at 23:15
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@SimonO101 In theory this should work will larger data but will just take more time (now how much ?). I'll update it as soon as possible and we'll have an idea of the BigO –  dickoa Jun 27 '13 at 23:19

In R 3.x+ you can construct a matrix of that size, the upper limit of vector sizes being 2^53 (or maybe 2^53-1 ), up from 2^31-1 as it was before which was why Andrie was throwing an error on his out-of-date installation. It generally takes 10 bytes per numeric element. At any rate:

> 2^53 < 10*60000^2
[1] FALSE  # so you are safe on that account.

It would also fit in 64GB (but not in 32GB):

> 64000000000 < 10*60000^2
[1] FALSE

Generally to do any serious work you need at least 3 times the size of your largest object, so this seems pretty borderline even with the new expanded vectors/matrices.

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with R version 3.0.0 (2013-04-03)## Platform: x86_64-w64-mingw32/x64 (64-bit) I get ## Error: cannot allocate vector of size 26.8 Gb .Do I need to upgrade to 3.0.1+? –  agstudy Jun 27 '13 at 23:12
    
@agstudy nope, just more RAM! –  Simon O'Hanlon Jun 27 '13 at 23:13
    
+1 for ticking Andrie off for being out of date with his R installation. Ha! :-) –  Simon O'Hanlon Jun 27 '13 at 23:16
    
I guess it might not have been the only reason it was failing for Andrie. It probably would also have failed on my six-year-old Mac, since it is maxxed out at 32GB of RAM. –  BondedDust Jun 27 '13 at 23:33
    
+1 for pointing out my old version of R as well as lack of RAM on my machine... –  Andrie Jun 28 '13 at 6:12

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