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why I can't assign variable i in subclass ?

class a {
   int i;
}


class b extends a {
   i=1;
}
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5  
Do it in a method. –  gd1 Jun 27 '13 at 20:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can assign variables in a subclass. What you can't do is put statements where only declarations are allowed. (Note that int i = 10; is a declaration - not a statement.)

In this case the constructor would likely be a suitable place to establish a default value (for the subtype):

class b extends a {
  public b () {
    i = 1;
  }
}

As damo suggested, an initialization block would also work. This is discussed in Initializing Fields tutorial:

Normally, you would put code to initialize an instance variable in a constructor [but] there are two alternatives to using a constructor to initialize instance variables: initializer blocks and final methods.

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... is a declaration - not a statement. I thought it's called declaration statement. lol –  l pm Jun 27 '13 at 21:00
    
@su- I'm not using precise JLS-backed terminology here and that very well be the case; the point is there is a distinction in the language grammar level and different productions are allowed (or prohibited) depending on the context. –  user2246674 Jun 27 '13 at 21:00
    
That's fine :) I see the point. –  l pm Jun 27 '13 at 21:02

All answers are correct but no one says that you can do this..

class b extends a {
   {
    i=1;
   }
}

And this will compile and be execute after a constructor and before b constructor

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As you are using the default access modifier, this means that the property in class a is accessible to all classes within the same package, including the subclass b. However, you must access the property in a method.

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class a {
   int i; // this is an instance variable
}

Instance variables are a class level, they can be assigned to a literal or reference variable or you can leave it to have it's default value, the subclass can use the public instances inside it's method or constructor not in the class level as you did :

class b extends a {
 i = 3; // assgining a literal to i is compilation error
}

Because it's the location that Class fields and Instance variables declared, not assigning a super class's instance variable to something.

If you want to use i inside class a, you have to use it inside some method or a constructor.

class b extends a {
 a(){
  i = 4;
} 

void doSomething(){
 i = 5;
}
}
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