Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I admit I've searched a bit and can't find the answer I am looking for. I feel like I am likely searching for the wrong tags.

I have a View that has a text box that applies some Validation via a validation class which implements ValidationRule. I have it properly validating and my text box highlights/tooltips appropiately.

Now that I have it validating, I thought maybe I could block a Submit button from being enabled while the Validation.HasError = true. My ViewModel has no knowledge of this ValidationRule, nor that the ValidationRule has returned false, "some error message". What is the proper way of doing this now? I'd prefer to keep the validation out side of my "Model" and leave it in the ValidationRule class.

Can I create a boolean property "HasValidationError" and set it to true when the Validation.HasError is set to true?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I suggest you put validation logic in ViewModel and using IDataErrorInfo to handle validation for UI. In our application, Validation is an independent service.

The benefit is you have full control to handle ViewModel level error and property level error. Even you find a way associate ViewModel's hasValidationError to all controls' ValidationRule, there is still a potential issue that your ViewModel's error only dependent on UI rather than its real logic, which means, before your UI validates the ViewModel, you can never tell whether ViewModel is correct.

share|improve this answer

I agree with Bill Zhang, when you are using the MVVM pattern, the validation logic should reside in the view model. The reasons are many, but the main one is that validation of a view should be testable, and it is much easier to test a view model than a view.

Enough with the preaching, lets see some code. You can have a look at my article Zip My Code on CodeProject where I validate in the view model. I can register a validator like this:

class ExcludeItemDialogViewModel : DialogViewModelBase
{
  public ExcludeItemDialogViewModel(string title, string excludeItem)
  {
    AddValidator(() => ExcludedItem, new NotNullOrEmptyValidationRule());

    // Code removed for clarity...
  }

  // Code removed for clarity...
}

Calling the method AddValidator will register a validator for a specific property in the view model, in this case ExcludedItem. The validation rule would look like this:

class NotNullOrEmptyValidationRule : IValidationRule
{
  public string ErrorMessage { get; private set; }

  public bool Validate(object value)
  {
    string valueText = value as string;

    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(valueText))
    {
      ErrorMessage = Resources.NotNullValidationRule_Error;
      return false;
    }

    ErrorMessage = string.Empty;
    return true;
  } 
}
share|improve this answer
    
So I took a look at your source code for that project. It looks like all validation is handled solely by the ViewModel, does this mean the View is never aware of validation errors? It would be nice to take advantage of the built in ValidationError things of the View (Like a textbox is highlighted red, with a mark in top left of the box indicating error message etc). Can this not be done or did I miss something in the code? –  Tada Jun 29 '13 at 13:24
    
The view is aware of the validation errors because the view model implements the IDataErrorInfo interface. It then accepts that the view model is responsible for reporting to the view when a validation error occurs. –  Disore Jun 29 '13 at 15:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.