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I have the following C code. I have two pointers pointing to the same object. It says double free error. Can someone help to see what the problem is? Thanks.

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct edge {
    int head;
} edge_t;

typedef struct edge_list_t {
    edge_t *edge;
} edge_list_t;
int main() {
    edge_list_t *p1;
    edge_list_t *p2;
    edge_t *c;

    p1 = malloc(sizeof(edge_list_t));
    p2 = malloc(sizeof(edge_list_t));

    c = malloc(sizeof(edge_t));

    p1->edge = c;
    p2->edge = c;

    free(c);

    if (p2->edge) {
        printf("not freed\n");
        free(p2->edge);
    } else {c
        printf("freed\n");
    }
    return 1;
}
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3  
freeing a block of memory doesn't set the pointers that pointed to that block to NULL. –  Tim Cooper Jun 27 '13 at 22:27
1  
You allocate three blocks and you free one of them twice. That's not good. –  David Schwartz Jun 27 '13 at 22:33
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow. Please read the FAQ soon. The c in } else {c is an unwanted interloper. Note that a main() program conventionally returns 0 on success and 1 (or any non-zero value) to indicate some sort of failure. But otherwise you've created a succinct question — well done. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 27 '13 at 22:35
    
@OP: maybe you want to look at the concept of reference counting, is that something you're after? –  user529758 Jun 27 '13 at 22:47

3 Answers 3

p2->edge = c;

free(c);

if (p2->edge) {
    printf("not freed\n");
    free(p2->edge);

^ the last free is a double free. Remember that after the first free call, the value of c is an invalid value.

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Could you tell me how to set the if condition such that the second free can be avoided? Thanks. –  user2529913 Jun 27 '13 at 22:29
    
if (p2->edge != c) free (p2->edge); –  David Schwartz Jun 27 '13 at 22:31
2  
@user2529913 p2->edge = NULL; after free(c);. –  ouah Jun 27 '13 at 22:31
1  
@DavidSchwartz after free(c), c value is an invalid address and so the expression p2->edge != c is technically undefined behavior. –  ouah Jun 27 '13 at 22:37
1  
I think the problem is three-fold (or, one way of looking at the question shows three problems): (1) the code should not execute free(c); once it has transferred control of c to one of the structures; and (2) the code should not let p1 and p2 share c, and (3) the code should release p1 and p2 via a function which releases the p->edge element as well as the main structure. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 27 '13 at 22:41

Here:

p2->edge = c;

free(c);

when you free c the value of c does not change and even if it did the value of p2->edge would stay the same. It would hold the original value of c of course. So you always free both c and p2->edge which both hold the same value.

To avoid that set c to NULL if you called free() on it and later check if(c) ,which will return false and not free c again.

Note: free() does not change the pointer in any way. It trust you that the pointer points to correct memory that was before never free()d.

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I added free(p2->edge), the if condition still enters the second free path. free(c); free(p2->edge); if (p2->edge) { printf("not freed\n"); free(p2->edge); } else { printf("freed\n"); } –  user2529913 Jun 27 '13 at 22:31
    
C doesn't protect you from shooting yourself in the foot; it assumes that you know that you are aiming dangerous weapons and you have some cogent reason to put holes in the extremities of your anatomy. It means it does not coddle beginners, which can be trying while you're learning the language. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 27 '13 at 22:37
    
When you do free(p2->edge), that releases the memory pointed to by p2->edge. Now p2->edge points to memory that you have freed, so why do you free it again? if (p2->edge) is just the same as if (p2->edge != NULL). p2->edge is not NULL, it points to the memory you freed. –  David Schwartz Jun 27 '13 at 22:41

You shouldn't free c once you've transferred control of it to p1, and you should not have both p1 and p2 sharing a single edge pointer, and you should release p1 and p2 via a function that also releases the edge pointer. These observations lead to:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct edge
{
    int head;
} edge_t;

typedef struct edge_list_t
{
    edge_t *edge;
} edge_list_t;

// Will acquire a loop when you have an actual list of edges
static void free_edge_list(edge_list_t *e)
{
    free(e->edge);
    free(e);
}

int main(void)
{
    edge_list_t *p1;
    edge_list_t *p2;
    edge_t *c;

    p1 = malloc(sizeof(edge_list_t));
    p2 = malloc(sizeof(edge_list_t));

    c = malloc(sizeof(edge_t));

    p1->edge = c;

    c = malloc(sizeof(edge_t));
    p2->edge = c;

    free_edge_list(p1);
    free_edge_list(p2);

    return 0;
}

In general, you should check that memory allocations succeed; this code (still) doesn't do that.

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