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I'm implementing an inverted index structure, in particular one that allows boolean queries, and word-level granularity.

I have large database of text, and I keep an index that tells me, for every word, in which file it is (IDdoc), and where in the file it is (position). (A word can be in many files and in many places in one file.)

Thus I keep a vector for each word:

vector<pair<IDdoc,position>> occurences_of_word;

(The vector is sorted by IDdoc and then by position, in ascending order.)

I have a string object made of words. This is the phrase I'm looking for.

For each word in the phrase I would like to know which documents contain this phrase, hence returning a vector of IDdocs.

Here is my attempt at a solution:

typedef std::string     Word_t;
typedef unsigned int    WordPosition_t;
typedef unsigned int    IDdocument_t;

vector<pair<IDdocument_t,WordPosition_t> > IndiceInvertidoBooleanoConPosicion::_interseccion_dos_listas
    (const vector<pair<IDdocument_t,WordPosition_t>> & v1,
    const vector<pair<IDdocument_t,WordPosition_t>> & v2)
{
vector<pair<IDdocument_t,WordPosition_t> > intersection;

IDdocument_t ID_doc_one, ID_doc_two;

int i = 0;
int j = 0;
const int MAX_INDEX_V1 = v1.size() -1;
const int MAX_INDEX_V2 = v2.size() -1;

while(i <= MAX_INDEX_V1  && j <= MAX_INDEX_V2)
{
    ID_doc_one = v1[i].first;
    ID_doc_two = v2[j].first;
    if (ID_doc_one < ID_doc_two)
        i++;
    else if (ID_doc_one > ID_doc_two)
        j++;
    else // The words were found in the same document!
    {
        WordPosition_t pos_word_one = v1[i].second;
        WordPosition_t pos_word_two = v2[j].second;

        // The words make a phrase!  Return pos_two for the next intersection finding step
        if (pos_word_one + 1 == pos_word_two)
        {
            intersection.push_back(make_pair(ID_doc_one,pos_word_two));
            i++;
            j++;
        }

        // Phrase not found
        else
        {
            if (pos_word_one < pos_word_two)
                i++;
            else
                j++;
        }

    }
}

return intersection;
}

int find_phrase(const string phrase, vector<IDdocument_t> & id_docs)
{
Word_t word;
id_docs.clear();
Text parsed_phrase;
// Extract the relevant words from the phrase
parsed_phrase.parse(phrase); 

vector<pair<IDdocument_t,WordPosition_t> > intersection;
vector<pair<IDdocument_t,WordPosition_t> > second_vector;

while (parsed_phrase.get_next_word(word) != RES_END)
{
    _find_vector_words(word,intersection);

    while (parsed_phrase.get_next_word(word) != RES_END)
    {
        _find_vector_words(word,second_vector);

        intersection = _intersect_two_words(intersection,second_vector);

    }
}

for (unsigned int i = 0; i < intersection.size(); i ++)
{
    IDdocument_t id_doc = intersection[i].first;
    if(std::find(id_docs.begin(), id_docs.end(), id_doc) == id_docs.end())
        id_docs.push_back(id_doc);
}

return RES_OK;
}
share|improve this question
    
Not sure what you are asking exactly - are you asking how to identify which of your documents contain "A number one philips screwdriver", or which documents contain the words "A", "number" "one", "philips" or "screwdriver". If the former, do they have to be consecutive or will "The number of handles on a screwdriver is one both for philips and pozidrive" be a match? –  Mats Petersson Jun 27 '13 at 23:03
    
@MatsPetersson, they need to be consecutive. –  l19 Jun 27 '13 at 23:12
    
Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/2659120/… –  jogojapan Jul 1 '13 at 2:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For looking up a particular Word from the string representation, you probably want to look at something like map. For creating a simple union of results you probably want set. This implementation is written more as a demonstration than as a highly desirable final implementation (c.f. sloppy phrase parsing).

#include <vector>
#include <map>
#include <set>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

typedef std::string IDdoc;
typedef int position;

typedef std::pair<IDdoc,position> Occurrence;
typedef std::vector<Occurrence> OccurrencesOfWord;
typedef std::map<std::string /*word*/, OccurrencesOfWord> Dictionary;
typedef std::set<IDdoc> Matches;

bool findMatchesForPhrase(const std::string& phrase, const Dictionary& dictionary, Matches& matches)
{
    size_t pos = 0;
    size_t len = 0;
    while (pos < phrase.length()) {
        size_t end = phrase.find(' ', pos);
        size_t len = ((end == phrase.npos) ? phrase.length() : end) - pos;
        std::string word(phrase, pos, len);
        pos += len + 1; // to skip the space.

        // ignore words not in the dictionary.
        auto dictIt = dictionary.find(word);
        if (dictIt == dictionary.end())
            continue;

        auto& occurrences = dictIt->second; // shortcut/alias,.
        for (auto& occurIt : occurrences) {
            // Add all the IDdoc's of this occurence to the set.
            matches.insert(occurIt.first);
        }
    }

    return !matches.empty();
}

void addToDictionary(Dictionary& dict, const char* word, const char* doc, int position)
{
    dict[word].push_back(std::make_pair(std::string(doc), position));
}

int main(int argc, const char** argv)
{
    std::string phrase("pizza is life");
    Dictionary dict;

    addToDictionary(dict, "pizza", "book1", 10);
    addToDictionary(dict, "pizza", "book2", 30);
    addToDictionary(dict, "life", "book1", 1);
    addToDictionary(dict, "life", "book3", 1);
    addToDictionary(dict, "goat", "book4", 99);

    Matches matches;
    bool result = findMatchesForPhrase(phrase, dict, matches);

    std::cout << "result = " << result << std::endl;
    for (auto& ent : matches) {
        std::cout << ent << std::endl;
    }

    return 0;
}

Online demo of this at: http://ideone.com/Zlhfua


Follow up to address your changes:

while(i < SIZE_VECTOR_ONE  && j < SIZE_VECTOR_TWO)
{
    if (ID_doc_one < ID_doc_two)
    {
        ID_doc_one = v1[++i].first;

Lets say "SIZE_VECTOR 1" is 1. That means that there is one element in the vector, element[0]. If ID_doc_one is 0 and ID_doc_two is 1, then

if (0 < 1) {
    ID_doc_one = v1[1].first;

which is invalid. You might be better off using iterators or pointers:

while (oneIt != v1.end() && twoIt != v2.end()) {
    if (oneIt->first < twoIt->first) {
        ++oneIt;
        continue;
    } else if (*twoIt < *oneIt) {
        ++twoIt;
        continue;
    }
    // same documentId in both lists, snag positions.
    ...
}

Next, this looks kinda broken:

    else {
    }   // To avoid "out of range" errors <-- but also ends the "else"
        if (i < SIZE_VECTOR_ONE - 1)
            ID_doc_one = v1[++i].first;
        if (j < SIZE_VECTOR_TWO - 1)
            ID_doc_two = v2[++j].first;
    }

And I wonder what happens if you have the same document but multiple positions?

This next is nit-picky, but it took me a long time to parse

    WordPosition_t pos_one = v1[i].second;
    WordPosition_t pos_two = v2[j].second;

    // The words make a phrase!  Return pos_two for the next intersection finding step
    if (pos_one + 1 == pos_two)

it seems vastly clearer to write this as you might say it "(if the second word is in the position after the first word):

    WordPosition_t posFirstWord = v1[i].second;
    WordPosition_t posSecondWord = v2[j].second;

    // The words make a phrase!  Return pos_two for the next intersection finding step
    if (posSecondWord == posFirstWord + 1)

This next part was kind of confusing, since both clauses appeared to be intended to increment i and j and update ID_doc_one and two, it would have made sense to hoist that part into a common section after the if block, but again the else {} made it hard to tell what you were actually doing.

    if (pos_one + 1 == pos_two)
    {
        intersection.push_back(make_pair(ID_doc_one,pos_two));
        ID_doc_one = v1[++i].first;
        ID_doc_two = v2[++j].first;
    }

    else {
    }   // To avoid "out of range" errors
        if (i < SIZE_VECTOR_ONE - 1)
            ID_doc_one = v1[++i].first;
        if (j < SIZE_VECTOR_TWO - 1)
            ID_doc_two = v2[++j].first;
    }

When you match both arrays, you always want to increment both i and j, it's not condition, I'm also not sure why you are using pos_two, since the phrase was actually found at pos_one?

This is how I would have written it:

#include<iostream>
#include<map>
#include<vector>
#include<string>

typedef std::string         Word_t;
typedef unsigned int        WordPosition_t;
typedef unsigned int        IDdocument_t;

typedef std::pair<IDdocument_t, WordPosition_t> DocumentPosition_t;
typedef std::vector<DocumentPosition_t> WordReferences_t;

WordReferences_t _intersect_two_words(const WordReferences_t& v1, const WordReferences_t& v2)
{
    // all the locations where the words occur one after the other.
    WordReferences_t intersection;

    auto firstIt = v1.begin();
    auto secondIt = v2.begin();
    while (firstIt != v1.end() && secondIt != v2.end())
    {
        if (firstIt->first < secondIt->first)
        {
            ++firstIt;
            continue;
        }
        // find the second word in the same document and AFTER the first word.
        if (secondIt->first < firstIt->first || secondIt->second < firstIt->second + 1)
        {
            ++secondIt;
            continue;
        }
        // first word wasn't just before the second, it's not a phrase.
        if (secondIt->second > firstIt->second + 1)
        {
            ++firstIt;
            continue;
        }
        // We found a phrase.
        intersection.emplace_back(*firstIt);
        ++firstIt;
        ++secondIt;
    }

    return intersection;
}

int main()
{
    WordReferences_t v1, v2;
    v1.push_back(std::make_pair(10, 5));
    v1.push_back(std::make_pair(10, 25));
    v1.push_back(std::make_pair(11, 10));
    v1.push_back(std::make_pair(12, 1));
    v1.push_back(std::make_pair(12, 11));
    v1.push_back(std::make_pair(12, 21));
    v1.push_back(std::make_pair(12, 31));
    v1.push_back(std::make_pair(15, 11));
    v1.push_back(std::make_pair(100, 1));
    v1.push_back(std::make_pair(100, 11));
    v1.push_back(std::make_pair(100, 21));
    v1.push_back(std::make_pair(101, 11));
    v1.push_back(std::make_pair(102, 11));
    v1.push_back(std::make_pair(102, 13));
    v1.push_back(std::make_pair(102, 14));
    v1.push_back(std::make_pair(103, 11));
    v1.push_back(std::make_pair(103, 13));

    v2.push_back(std::make_pair(10, 11));
    v2.push_back(std::make_pair(12, 10));
    v2.push_back(std::make_pair(12, 40));
    v2.push_back(std::make_pair(16, 11));
    v2.push_back(std::make_pair(100, 12)); // match
    v2.push_back(std::make_pair(101, 12)); // match
    v2.push_back(std::make_pair(101, 13));
    v2.push_back(std::make_pair(101, 14));
    v2.push_back(std::make_pair(102, 12)); //match
    v2.push_back(std::make_pair(103, 1));
    v2.push_back(std::make_pair(103, 10));
    v2.push_back(std::make_pair(103, 12)); // match
    v2.push_back(std::make_pair(103, 15));

    auto intersection = _intersect_two_words(v1, v2);
    for (auto entry : intersection)
    {
        std::cout << entry.first << ", " << entry.second << "+" << (entry.second + 1) << std::endl;
    }

    return 0;
}

Live example: http://ideone.com/XRfhAI

share|improve this answer
    
Hey, do you mind checking out my original post? I've posted my solution. Thanks! –  l19 Jun 30 '13 at 18:28
1  
See my amended reply. –  kfsone Jun 30 '13 at 20:39
    
Thanks @kfsone! I updated my post with my new version of the code. –  l19 Jul 1 '13 at 2:31

I don't know if this is the most efficient, but you could start with the documents/positions of words[0]. Then go to words[1] and find intersecting documents with positions equal to words[0].position + words[0].length + 1 for the same documents. Then likewise iterate over the rest of words. It should narrow down pretty quickly for longer phrases?

share|improve this answer

As you are stated, the data structure you are using is in fact a full inverted index, as stated by Wikipedia:

There are two main variants of inverted indexes: A record level inverted index (or inverted file index or just inverted file) contains a list of references to documents for each word. A word level inverted index (or full inverted index or inverted list) additionally contains the positions of each word within a document.[2] The latter form offers more functionality (like phrase searches), but needs more time and space to be created.

That being said, you can also try to create a phrase index:

http://ww2.cs.mu.oz.au/~jz/fulltext/acmtois04.pdf

(See Figure 2 as a demonstration).

If you are not creating a phrase index, then what you can do (I believe), would be to simply retrieve the documents containing a specific word, intersect the set of documents you are having as you grow the query from words to phrases and then finally go back to the document and see if each returned document you are having in fact contains "the phrase" instead of "words separating each other at different positions".

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it is in fact part of the implementation of an inverted index :-) –  l19 Jul 1 '13 at 2:36

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