Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I"m new to Javascript and programming in general and came upon this block of code from a book called Javascript Enlightenment (p.88):

var parentFunction = function() {
    var foo = 'foo';
    return function() { // anonymous function being returned
        console.log(foo); // logs 'foo'
    }
}
// nestedFunction refers to the nested function returned from parentFunction

var nestedFunction = parentFunction();

nestedFunction(); /* logs foo because the returned function accesses foo
via the scope chain */

Why does setting var nestedFunction = parentFunction(); enable nestedFunction(); to invoke the nested anonymous function and log "foo" to the console whereas using just parentFunction(); logs nothing at all?

share|improve this question
    
And why foo can be accessed even though it should be out of scope is because JS uses somehing called closures: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Guide/Closures – HMR Jun 28 '13 at 0:19
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Basically you're doing:

parentFunction()(); // double parenthesis

Parenthesis mean that you execute the function, which will return a value. If that value is a function you can then execute it.

If you call it only once, well, you just get the function so nothing gets console.logged

share|improve this answer
    
Aha! This makes sense. Thank you for your clear and concise explanation and thanks also to everyone else who answered. – edubba Jun 28 '13 at 0:33

Invoking parentFunction returns the anonymous function without calling it.

nestedFunction gets set as the return of parentFunction, the anonymous function.

Invoking nestedFunction hence invokes the anonymous function.

The anonymous function uses console.log so you see "foo".

share|improve this answer

An alternative to your code is this

var parentFunction = function() {
  var foo = "foo";
  return console.log.bind(console);
}

parentFunction()();
// => "foo"

Inevitably, you'll want to do something with scope at some point, so you'd do it like this

var parentFunction = function() {
  this.foo = "foo";
  this.something = function(){
    console.log(this.foo);
  }
  return this.something.bind(this);
}

parentFunction()();
// => "foo"
share|improve this answer
function add (x) {
    return function (y) {
        return x + y;
    };
}
var add5 = add(5);
 add5(3);

Explained:

When the add function is called, it returns a function. That function closes the context and remembers what the parameter x was at exactly that time (i.e. 5 in the code above) When the result of calling the add function is assigned to the variable add5, it will always know what x was when it was initially created. The add5 variable above refers to a function which will always add the value 5 to what is being sent in. That means when add5 is called with a value of 3, it will add 5 together with 3, and return

Please refer this link...

http://robertnyman.com/2008/10/09/explaining-javascript-scope-and-closures/

share|improve this answer

Because parentFunction is returning the nested function, which needs to be invoked in order to run.

var a = nestedFunction;

doesn't log anything, because it hasn't been executed, until you do this:

a();
share|improve this answer

Rewrite that code as this:

var nestedFunction = null;

var parentFunction = function() {
    var foo = 'foo';
    nestedFunction = function() { // anonymous function being returned
        console.log(foo); // logs 'foo'
    }
}

parentFunction(); 
// outputs nothing
// but initializes nestedFunction by its local function

nestedFunction(); /* logs foo because that local function has access to local 'foo' of
the parent function */

As you see parent function outputs nothing but initializes nestedFunction variable by function reference. And that function reference can be called as any other function.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.