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I need to get a series of dates by using the day of the week and the time as the only bit of information.

I am aware of the reverse of this operation, that is using WEEKDAY(date) or DAYOFWEEK(date), but this is not what I need.

I have a table, which looks like this, which will be continuously scanned and compared to the current date.

+----+---------+----------+----------+
| id | weekday | start    | end      |
+----+---------+----------+----------+
|  1 |       1 | 09:00:00 | 17:00:00 |
|  2 |       2 | 09:00:00 | 17:00:00 |
|  3 |       3 | 09:00:00 | 17:00:00 |
|  4 |       4 | 23:00:00 | 17:00:00 |
|  5 |       5 | 18:00:00 | 23:00:00 |
|  6 |       6 | 00:00:00 | 00:00:00 |
|  7 |       7 | 00:00:00 | 01:00:00 |
+----+---------+----------+----------+

The above is the simple version, I expect this table to have hundreds or thousands of possible iterations. As observed on the 4th row, the times may also go over midnight, and I must compensate.

I need a query which will provide me with the following result sets, and am having trouble with locking down onto the date, based by the current year, month and the passed day of the week from the weekday column.

Example result set:

+---------------------+---------------------+
| start               | end                 |
+---------------------+---------------------+
| 2013-06-24 09:00:00 | 2013-06-24 17:00:00 |
| 2013-06-25 09:00:00 | 2013-06-25 17:00:00 |
| 2013-06-26 09:00:00 | 2013-06-26 17:00:00 |
| 2013-06-27 23:00:00 | 2013-06-28 17:00:00 | # <---- Notice the date difference here
| 2013-06-28 18:00:00 | 2013-06-28 23:00:00 |
| 2013-06-29 00:00:00 | 2013-06-30 00:00:00 | # <---- Also here, the span is 24 hours
| 2013-06-30 00:00:00 | 2013-06-30 01:00:00 |
+---------------------+---------------------+

Any help would be appreciated, I have gotten as close to getting the CURRENT DATE only, however, this poses some problems to me, as these dates later need to be converted, so I need an array of all of them, not just the current day's.

Edit: Posted my current code: Though I do not believe this is quite headed in the right direction

SELECT  TIMESTAMP(IF (end < start,
                     CURRENT_DATE,
                     SUBDATE(CURRENT_DATE, 1)),
                  start) AS 'start',

        TIMESTAMP(IF (end < start,
                     CURRENT_DATE,
                     SUBDATE(CURRENT_DATE, 1))
                  end) AS 'end',

  FROM  shift

And the result:

+---------------------+---------------------+
| start               | end                 |
+---------------------+---------------------+
| 2013-06-27 23:00:00 | 2013-06-28 17:00:00 | 
| 2013-06-28 18:00:00 | 2013-06-28 23:00:00 | # Needs the rest of the dates of the week
+---------------------+---------------------+

SECOND EDIT

Thanks to the below commenters' help, I have arrived at the below query, moving forward though, some have expressed concern with the design and I will be running some tests before I settle on an answer. If there is a better way to get this done, I would be really interested in hearing it!

I suppose the best point is when the month changes half way through the query, using the day of the week to determine the difference might be troublesome.

Query:

SELECT  @diff:=(CAST(weekday AS SIGNED) - (WEEKDAY(CURRENT_DATE) + 1)) as 'diff',
        @date:=DATE_ADD(CURRENT_DATE, INTERVAL @diff DAY) as 'start_date',
        TIMESTAMP(@date, start) AS 'start',
        TIMESTAMP(IF (end <= start,
                     DATE_ADD(@date, INTERVAL 1 DAY),
                     @date),
                  end) AS 'end'
 FROM   shift

Result:

+------+------------+---------------------+---------------------+
| diff | start_date | start               | end                 |
+------+------------+---------------------+---------------------+
|   -4 | 2013-06-24 | 2013-06-24 09:00:00 | 2013-06-24 17:00:00 |
|   -3 | 2013-06-25 | 2013-06-25 09:00:00 | 2013-06-25 17:00:00 |
|   -2 | 2013-06-26 | 2013-06-26 09:00:00 | 2013-06-26 17:00:00 |
|   -1 | 2013-06-27 | 2013-06-27 23:00:00 | 2013-06-28 17:00:00 |
|    0 | 2013-06-28 | 2013-06-28 18:00:00 | 2013-06-28 23:00:00 |
|    1 | 2013-06-29 | 2013-06-29 00:00:00 | 2013-06-30 00:00:00 |
|    2 | 2013-06-30 | 2013-06-30 00:00:00 | 2013-06-30 10:00:00 |
+------+------------+---------------------+---------------------+

Third Edit

I have tested the above query over periods which span across the month's beginnings and ends and have found it to be suitable for its purpose, I will move the above query as well as some notes to an answer in hopes that someone may find this useful in future.

On that note, I will also include the various gotchas and recommendations from the various commenters, again thanks to everyone who took the time to help.

share|improve this question
    
Please show what you've tried, so we can help you fix it instead of writing code for you. –  Barmar Jun 28 '13 at 1:04
    
I had not posted what I had so far because I don't think it's headed in the right direction, nor did I really intend for others to write my code for me :) However, since you asked, there it is. –  francisco.preller Jun 28 '13 at 1:20
    
The calculation of the date part of end needs to add 1 if end < start, that solves the overnight problem. The other problem is because your WHERE clause is just selecting the rows that match CURRENT_DATE -- I don't think you need the WHERE clause at all. –  Barmar Jun 28 '13 at 1:27
    
Thanks, that gets all the dates available, but it does not add the proper days to the results, it simply iterates between the current date and the (current date - 1) -- the reason the where clause was there initially (and the reason I said I did not feel I was headed the right direction) is because I was attempting to use the current date as a pin point to get the dates around it. The query works well for only today and yesterday, but not for the rest of the week. –  francisco.preller Jun 28 '13 at 1:31
    
It looks like this is a weekly schedule of work shifts. I wonder if your logic would be clearer if your table contained day / start-time / duration. The overnight shifts would certainly stand out more clearly. –  Ollie Jones Jun 28 '13 at 1:32

2 Answers 2

Okay, so the way I got around your issue is to create a table of dates (it can even be a temp table created on the fly). Rather than trying to fake the time differences by concatenating the dates to the times, I'm actually pulling the difference in seconds and adding them to the first DATETIME stamp that we're pulling with concatenating the date with the time where the DAYOFWEEK(mydate) = weekday. The IF statements are saying if the hours are equal then use 24 hours, otherwise use the absolute value of the time difference to calculate the seconds.

Not rocket science, but a little challenging.

The main SQL I'm using is this (hard returns added here for formatting):

select  m.mydate,
CONVERT(CONCAT_WS(' ',m.mydate,s.start) USING latin1) as startTime,
if(s.start=s.end,86400,
ABS(MOD(TIME_TO_SEC(s.end)-TIME_TO_SEC(s.start),86400))) as secs,
CONVERT(CONCAT_WS(' ',m.mydate,s.start) + INTERVAL
if(s.start=s.end,86400,
ABS(MOD(TIME_TO_SEC(s.end)-TIME_TO_SEC(s.start),86400))) 
second  USING latin1) as endTime  from StackOverflow.shifts s,
StackOverflow.mydates m where DAYOFWEEK(m.mydate)=s.weekday;

Output looks like this:

mydate      startTime           secs    endTime
2013-06-27  2013-06-27 18:00:00 18000   2013-06-27 23:00:00
2013-06-28  2013-06-28 00:00:00 86400   2013-06-29 00:00:00
2013-06-29  2013-06-29 00:00:00 3600    2013-06-29 01:00:00
2013-06-30  2013-06-30 09:00:00 28800   2013-06-30 17:00:00
2013-07-01  2013-07-01 09:00:00 28800   2013-07-01 17:00:00
2013-07-02  2013-07-02 09:00:00 28800   2013-07-02 17:00:00
2013-07-03  2013-07-03 23:00:00 21600   2013-07-04 05:00:00

Here's the SQL Fiddle.

Update

I'm not advocating this method by any means. I was simply answering the original question given the information that was available. Sometimes data comes in various forms and it's harder to work with than one would have the luxury of if they could mandate the format of the data. While it seemed impossible at first simply trying to use one table, adding the table of dates (or even a temp table) made it a lot easier. The only other issue I can think of that might arise would be a shift going over a daylight savings time change, which would add or subtract an hour, which this method does not account for.

share|improve this answer
    
That's quite the query. Thanks I will study this and see if it brings any benefit over the query demonstrated on what I put under 'Second Edit' on the question. I think what I ended up with is quite a bit simpler but I would welcome any comments on why this is a better option than what I have? Also, +1 :) I can tell you spent quite some time on this! –  francisco.preller Jun 28 '13 at 5:02
    
@francisco.preller it took about 20 minutes. I fought a little with the latin1 thing because it was returning a blob in MySQL Workbench. –  AbsoluteƵERØ Jun 28 '13 at 5:13
    
Hmm, interesting, this might be why C# is giving me grief converting a TIMESTAMP() function derived column to a DateTime value, it seems to think its of byte[] data type... Just tried it, you're absolutely right. Wish I could give you more upvotes. –  francisco.preller Jun 28 '13 at 5:14
    
Thanks for the info. Even if I preferred my method in the end, you have shown me quite a few things. –  francisco.preller Jun 28 '13 at 5:24
    
@francisco.preller cool. That's what this site is all about. –  AbsoluteƵERØ Jun 28 '13 at 5:25
up vote 0 down vote accepted

After quite the bit of hacking away at it, I came to the answer below which I am presenting in case anyone runs into a similar issue in future. I would like to thank everyone who took the time to help, I found the variety of answers quite helpful and I guess I will list my findings below.

The query I ended up with was:

SELECT  @diff:=(CAST(weekday AS SIGNED) - (WEEKDAY(CURRENT_DATE) + 1)) as 'diff',
        @date:=DATE_ADD(CURRENT_DATE, INTERVAL @diff DAY) as 'start_date',
        CONVERT(TIMESTAMP(@date, start) USING latin1) AS 'start',
        CONVERT(TIMESTAMP(IF (end <= start,
                     DATE_ADD(@date, INTERVAL 1 DAY),
                     @date),
                  end) USING latin1) AS 'end'
 FROM   shift

There are quite a few things happening there:

  1. First I aim to get the difference between the current weekday and the one listed in the table.
  2. The weekday column on my table was actually referenced by an UNSIGNED INTEGER, which was making it impossible to get a difference in days when that difference was negative.
  3. The above problem was solved by using the CAST function, it had to be casted to a SIGNED integer instead which allows for negatives.
  4. The @date variable is only being used as a placeholder to use it in other places in the query.
  5. The TIMESTAMP function was returning a byte array into C# instead of a string or date data, Thanks to AbsoluteZERO for pointing out the conversion into latin1 which amended the issue.

The above query returns the following data which is what the desired outcome was. Since the table is set in UTC and the time being checked is then converted by C# on the business logic, this is sufficient to bypass any issues which may arise via daylight savings for such computations.

Resulting data:

+------+------------+---------------------+---------------------+
| diff | start_date | start               | end                 |
+------+------------+---------------------+---------------------+
|   -4 | 2013-06-24 | 2013-06-24 09:00:00 | 2013-06-24 17:00:00 |
|   -3 | 2013-06-25 | 2013-06-25 09:00:00 | 2013-06-25 17:00:00 |
|   -2 | 2013-06-26 | 2013-06-26 09:00:00 | 2013-06-26 17:00:00 |
|   -1 | 2013-06-27 | 2013-06-27 23:00:00 | 2013-06-28 17:00:00 |
|    0 | 2013-06-28 | 2013-06-28 18:00:00 | 2013-06-28 23:00:00 |
|    1 | 2013-06-29 | 2013-06-29 00:00:00 | 2013-06-30 00:00:00 |
|    2 | 2013-06-30 | 2013-06-30 00:00:00 | 2013-06-30 10:00:00 |
+------+------------+---------------------+---------------------+

Hope this helps someone.

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