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What is the difference between the following two Perl variable declarations?

my $foo = 'bar' if 0;

my $baz;
$baz = 'qux' if 0;

The difference is significant when these appear at the top of a loop. For example:

use warnings;
use strict;

foreach my $n (0,1){
    my $foo = 'bar' if 0;
    print defined $foo ? "defined\n" : "undefined\n";
    $foo = 'bar';
    print defined $foo ? "defined\n" : "undefined\n";
}

print "==\n";

foreach my $m (0,1){
    my $baz;
    $baz = 'qux' if 0;
    print defined $baz ? "defined\n" : "undefined\n";
    $baz = 'qux';
    print defined $baz ? "defined\n" : "undefined\n";
}

results in

undefined
defined
defined
defined
==
undefined
defined
undefined
defined

It seems that if 0 fails, so foo is never reinitialized to undef. In this case, how does it get declared in the first place?

share|improve this question
    
perl -MO=Deparse yourfile prints those if 0 lines as '???';, and the output, recompiled, dies for want of explicit package names. So I'd conclude that such constructions should be avoided, that if Perl had a standard this would be noted as exercising undefined behavior, etc. But maybe someone will provide the perlguts explanation. –  Julian Fondren Jun 28 '13 at 3:57
    
@Julian Fondren, '???' just means the code was optimized away. (e.g. perl -MO=Deparse -e"1,2,3" and perl -MO=Deparse -le"print 'abc' if 0;" show question marks even though both snippets are perfectly legit.) Deparse showing question marks for my $x if 0; would be a bug if my $x if 0; was allowed since my has a compile-time effect, though it's true that its runtime effect is optimized away. –  ikegami Jun 28 '13 at 4:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

First, note that my $foo = 'bar' if 0; is documented to be undefined behaviour, meaning it's allowed to do anything including crash. But I'll explain what happens anyway.


my $x has three documented effects:

  • It declares a symbol at compile-time.
  • It creates an new variable on execution.
  • It returns the new variable on execution.

In short, it's suppose to be like Java's Scalar x = new Scalar();, except it returns the variable if used in an expression.

But if it actually worked that way, the following would create 100 variables:

for (1..100) {
   my $x = rand();
   print "$x\n";
}

This would mean two or three memory allocations per loop iteration for the my alone! A very expensive prospect. Instead, Perl only creates one variable and clears it at the end of the scope. So in reality, my $x actually does the following:

  • It declares a symbol at compile-time.
  • It creates the variable at compile-time[1].
  • It puts a directive on the stack that will clear[2] the variable when the scope is exited.
  • It returns the new variable on execution.

As such, only one variable is ever created[2]. This is much more CPU-efficient than then creating one every time the scope is entered.

Now consider what happens if you execute a my conditionally, or never at all. By doing so, you are preventing it from placing the directive to clear the variable on the stack, so the variable never loses its value. Obviously, that's not meant to happen, so that's why my ... if ...; isn't allowed.


Some take advantage of the implementation as follows:

sub foo {
   my $state if 0;
   $state = 5 if !defined($state);
   print "$state\n";
   ++$state;
}

foo();  # 5
foo();  # 6
foo();  # 7

But doing so requires ignoring the documentation forbidding it. The above can be achieved safely using

{
   my $state = 5;
   sub foo {
      print "$state\n";
      ++$state;
   }
}

or

use feature qw( state );  # Or: use 5.010;

sub foo {
   state $state = 5;
   print "$state\n";
   ++$state;
}

Notes:

  1. "Variable" can mean a couple of things. I'm not sure which definition is accurate here, but it doesn't matter.

  2. If anything but the sub itself holds a reference to the variable (REFCNT>1) or if variable contains an object, the directive replaces the variable with a new one (on scope exit) instead of clearing the existing one. This allows the following to work as it should:

    my @a;
    for (...) {
        my $x = ...;
        push @a, \$x;
    }
    
share|improve this answer
    
I still don't understand why some of the my behaviour works (we don't get Global symbol "$foo" requires explicit package name later on) but some doesn't (directive to clear the variable on the stack). –  ajwood Jun 28 '13 at 11:49
    
As he said, the lexical/global distinction happens at compile time and is not affected by the conditional. The clear directive is a run time behavior and is disabled by an if 0. –  tjd Jun 28 '13 at 13:05
1  
@ajwood, The variable declaration happens at compile-time (where it doesn't matter if the code is ever run), and the clearing happens at run-time (where it does matter). -ikegami –  user2525443 Jun 28 '13 at 13:10
    
On note 1, it is no longer accurate. There actually appears to be a hack to do different things if the conditional is always false, or merely can be false. Try perl -wle 'sub foo {my $state = shift if @_; print $state} foo(); foo(5); foo()' to see what I mean. This fixes the common hard to find bugs from the old way of doing things. (And I have a heartfelt thank you to whoever fixed it!) –  btilly Oct 9 '13 at 1:15
    
@btilly, The code you gave prints the same thing from Perl 5.8 (earliest I have) to 5.19.5 (lastest that exists). I don't know what change you think happened, but your code doesn't prove it. –  ikegami Oct 9 '13 at 2:30

See ikegami's better answer, probably above.

In the first example, you never define $foo inside the loop because of the conditional, so when you use it, you're referencing and then assigning a value to an implicitly declared global variable. Then, the second time through the loop that outside variable is already defined.

In the second example, $baz is defined inside the block each time the block is executed. So the second time through the loop it is a new, not yet defined, local variable.

share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't use warnings or use strict have something to say about that though? They don't. –  ajwood Jun 28 '13 at 2:48
    
"an implicitly declared variable in the containing scope". er, which to say, a package variable. But he's not, as you can see by giving $::foo and $::baz a value and printing them when the defined passes. And when there is a lexical variable outside these loops that they could refer to, the same measure shows that the behavior doesn't change for either loop. –  Julian Fondren Jun 28 '13 at 3:48
    
There's no such thing as "implicitly declared variable in the containing scope". Implicit;y declared variables are package variables which are global. Both $foo and $baz are lexical variables. See my answer for what's actually happening. –  ikegami Jun 28 '13 at 4:29
    
You're right about global. I fixed it. –  Charles Engelke Jun 28 '13 at 12:33

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