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I have 2 set of immutable/mutable types.

@class AAA;
@class BBB;

@class MutableAAA;
@class MutableBBB;

@interface AAA : NSObject
@property (readonly,nonatomic,copy)    BBB*    bbb;
@end

@interface BBB : NSObject
@property (readonly,nonatomic,copy)    AAA*    aaa;
@end

@interface MutableAAA : AAA
@property (readwrite,nonatomic,copy)   MutableBBB*    bbb;
@end

@interface MutableBBB : BBB
@property (readwrite,nonatomic,copy)   MutableAAA*    aaa;
@end

Because Objective-C support return type covariance, this is perfectly legal, but the problem is two classes are referencing mutually, I don't know how to let the compiler to know the MutableBBB is a subclass of BBB before defining it.

Of course, I can fallback to category to work around this, but I want to define these in the primary interface body because this is a part of essential class definition rather than extra method.

Currently Clang is generating warning. How can I do this without warning?

Update

My intension is exposing mutable class type to enable in-place editing over object tree. readonly/readwrite doesn't matter actually. I think I have two options which I want to avoid.

  • Using category.
  • Adding separated mutable version accessor. (like -mutableBytes method in NSMutableData)

I just want to know whether there is some unknown feature that I don't know yet which enable this mutually referencing subclassing.

share|improve this question
    
what is warning says ?? –  iPatel Jun 28 '13 at 3:56
    
Warning is: test.m:18:55: warning: property type 'MutableBBB *' is incompatible with type 'BBB *' inherited from 'AAA' –  dreamlax Jun 28 '13 at 4:00
1  
I've got to commend the kind and level of your questions, man. Your history is filled with some of the most engaging questions about the Objective-C language I've ever seen on the site. –  CodaFi Jun 28 '13 at 4:21

1 Answer 1

This is a question that's easier than it looks, thanks to recent advances in the language. This is exactly the reason that class extensions exist, and to illustrate my point, I've defined an interface and a pseudo-method file.

//  CFIAAAsAndBBBs.h

@class AAA;
@class BBB;

@interface AAA : NSObject
@property (readonly,nonatomic,copy)    BBB*    bbb;
@end

@interface BBB : NSObject
@property (readonly,nonatomic,copy)    AAA*    aaa;
@end

@interface MutableAAA : AAA
@end

@interface MutableBBB : BBB
@end

First, notice the changes I've made to the header. Instead of having readwrite properties exposed in the header, you move them to the implementation file. If you need to expose them to any other object, just declare another set of readwrite properties using the superclasses you've defined instead of their mutable counterparts. In that way, you avoid exposing mutability, and you can safely redeclare the property in a class extension later if you need it to be internally readwrite. Speaking of internal readwrite properties, here's the m file:

//  CFIAAAsAndBBBs.m

#import "CFIAAAsAndBBBs.h"

@interface MutableAAA ()
@property (readwrite,nonatomic,copy)   MutableBBB*    bbb;
@end

@interface MutableBBB ()
@property (readwrite,nonatomic,copy)   MutableAAA*    aaa;
@end
//...

No more warnings, everybody walks away a winner.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, class extension can be thought as a kind of category, and my intention was exposing mutator methods. I think category as my last resort. –  Eonil Jun 28 '13 at 5:26
    
You shouldn't be exposing mutable properties in the first place. Use mutator methods as a wrapper around the category. –  CodaFi Jun 28 '13 at 6:19

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