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After a bit of head scratching, I've determined that signed and unsigned chars have a surprising difference when it comes to == signs.

void loop()
{
}

void setup()
{
  unsigned char ucA = 0x55;
  unsigned char ucB = 0xAA;
  unsigned char ucB_not;

  char cA = 0x55;
  char cB = 0xAA;

  Serial.begin( 115200);

  if ( ucA == ~ucB)
    Serial.println( "unsigned -- match");
  else
    Serial.println( "unsigned -- no match");


  if ( cA == ~cB)
    Serial.println( "signed -- match");
  else
    Serial.println( "signed -- no match");

  ucB_not = ~ucB;
  if ( ucA == ucB_not)
    Serial.println( "unsigned, seperate variable -- match");
  else
    Serial.println( "unsigned, seperate variable -- no match");

}

The output I get is:

unsigned -- no match
signed -- match
unsigned, seperate variable -- match

Is there some rule that the values get widened before the compare? Even if so, the unsigned case should not be a problem, should it?

I've added the last case -- creating a seperate variable seems to not have the problem.

I'm using the Arduino release 1.0.5.

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

In both C and C++, the operands of operators which are integer types narrower than int gets promoted to an int. If the smaller type is signed, then the promoted type is sign extended - the signed char value -x is promoted to a signed int with the same value -x, which in 2's complement machines means prefixing it with some 0xff bytes. If the result of an operation is assigned back to the smaller type, it is truncated.

Your three cases apply these rules as follows:

  1. Unsigned char 0xaa is promoted to unsigned int 0x00aa and unsigned char 0x55 to unsigned int 0x0055. Inverting 0x00aa gives 0xff55 which is not equal to 0x0055.

  2. Signed char 0xaa is promoted to signed int 0xffaa ( negative signed value is sign extended - signed char value -86 is promoted to signed int value -86 ) and signed char 0x55 to signed int 0x0055 (positive signed char value +85 is promoted to signed int value +85 ). Inverting 0xffaa gives 0x0055 which is equal to 0x0055.

  3. Unsigned char 0xaa is promoted to unsigned int 0x00aa, inverted to 0xff55 then stored as an unsigned char, causing it to be truncated to 0x55. The unsigned char 0x55 is later compared with the unsigned char 0x55 and found to be equal.

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