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I want to understand C++ as much as I can. If there is a base class B and a derived class D. D d; instantiate a derived object.

  1. B & rb = d;, rb refers to derived object d. This does NOT instantiate a new object of base class. So which memory part does rb refer to?

  2. B newb = d;, this will call will call the copy constructor of base class. Object d will first be bound to the parameter type const B&, and then a new object of base class is instantiated.

  3. B newbb(static_cast<B>(d));, what will be accomplished in this statement?

The three statements above are my own way to understand the copy/move/conversion of objects. But they really confuses me. I cannot find an effective and clear way to interpret the codes, though I have read the corresponding part of C++11 standard.

I hope answers to explain the three statements with code quotation. What happened during the object copy/move/conversion.


Help! Hope answers from you guys!!

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@JohannesSchaub-litb Would you help clarify this question Many thx. –  Zachary Jun 29 '13 at 6:55
    
@JerryCoffin I need your help on this. –  Zachary Jun 29 '13 at 6:56
    
If you are looking for help on understanding my answer, I'm willing to help with any questions. Or did I misunderstand the question? –  Ben S. Jul 2 '13 at 0:41

1 Answer 1

In general, these should all be copy operations, sometimes with conversions first. I'll cover move operations below.

Part 1: The language that I'm about to use might differ from the standard a little bit, but I would tend to think of rb as referring to the whole object d. The reason I say that is that when I'm doing something like this, D almost always has a least one virtual function, and any virtual function called through rb will run the version from D, not B. For example, if we have:

class B
{
public:
    virtual int get_value() { return 10; }
};

class D: public B
{
public:
    virtual int get_value() { return 20; }
};

Then rb.get_value() will return 20, not 10 like you might be thinking.

Part 2: This is actually something that you almost never want to do. What happens here is that the d is converted to a B by a process called "slicing", which discards the part that was unique to D and leaves only the B part, which is then copied to create newb. This might sound useful, but in practice you probably want to either create a complete copy of d rather than a partial one, or you don't want to create a copy at all and instead want to use a pointer or reference to d.

If you want to create a complete copy, you would probably want a virtual function to do the copy, like this:

class B
{
public:
    virtual B *clone()
    {
        return new B(*this);
    }
};

class D: public B
{
public:
    virtual B *clone()
    {
        return new D(*this);
    }
};

Part 3: This is essentially the same as Part 2 - the presence of the static_cast just makes the slicing explicit rather than something that the compiler does automatically. Again, this is probably not something you will want to do very often.


Depending on context, expressions like the ones you are using might become move operations instead. For example, if d were about to be destroyed, the compiler might recognize that and call a move function instead of a copy, since moving is generally more efficient. For example:

B foo()
{
    D d;
    return d;
}

In C++11, the return-statement might call the move constructor (if it exists) rather than the copy constructor to create the return value. That said, the effect should be pretty similar - the slicing that happens in Parts 2 and 3 would happen whichever of the two constructors was called.

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