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Context: I'm a CS n00b working my way through "Cracking the Coding Interview." The first problem asks to "implement an algorithm to determine if a string has all unique characters." My (likely naive) implementation is as follows:

def isUniqueChars2(string):
  uchars = []
  for c in string:
    if c in uchars:
      return False
    else:
      uchars.append(c)
  return True

The author suggests the following implementation:

def isUniqueChars(string):
  checker = 0
  for c in string:
    val = ord(c) - ord('a')
    if (checker & (1 << val) > 0):
      return False
    else:
      checker |= (1 << val)
  return True

What makes the author's implementation better than mine (FWIW, the author's solution was in Java and I converted it to Python -- is my solution one that is not possible to implement in Java)? Or, more generally, what is desirable in a solution to this problem? What is wrong with the approach I've taken? I'm assuming there are some fundamental CS concepts (that I'm not familiar with) that are important and help inform the choice of which approach to take to this problem.

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2  
Don't name variables dict, especially if the variable in question isn't even a dict! –  Henry Keiter Jun 28 '13 at 4:51
1  
yours does a linear search because your dict is not a real dict –  aaronman Jun 28 '13 at 4:51
    
There is absolutely nothing wrong with your solutions, it will work, it's a python way to solve this problem. –  PepperoniPizza Jun 28 '13 at 4:51
3  
Your solution works fine and is Pythonic. It would be quicker if you used a set rather than a list, for O(1) lookup. It's slower than the author's code, but far more Pythonic (presumably why the author's code wasn't written in Python...) –  Henry Keiter Jun 28 '13 at 4:54
    
I see you made an edit to rename dict to uchars. May I suggest you revert this change, since several comments refer to this mistake, and several replies have already addressed your actual question? Changing the question underneath just makes things confusing to new visitors. –  tripleee Jun 28 '13 at 4:57
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5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Here is how I would write this:

def unique(s):
    return len(set(s)) == len(s)

Strings are iterable so you can pass your argument directly to set() to get a set of the characters from the string (which by definition will not contain any duplicates). If the length of that set is the same as the length of the original string then you have entirely unique characters.

Your current approach is fine and in my opinion it is much more Pythonic and readable than the version proposed by the author, but you should change uchars to be a set instead of a list. Sets have O(1) membership test so c in uchars will be considerably faster on average if uchars is a set rather than a list. So your code could be written as follows:

def unique(s):
    uchars = set()
    for c in s:
        if c in uchars:
            return False
        uchars.add(c)
    return True

This will actually be more efficient than my version if the string is large and there are duplicates early, because it will short-circuit (exit as soon as the first duplicate is found).

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I had thought the exact same thing, except mine was a lambda. Well done. –  Makoto Jun 28 '13 at 4:56
    
That was indeed pythonic ... –  Tushar Makkar Jun 28 '13 at 5:05
    
Thank you for your response @F.J! Can you explain what you mean by "sets have O(1) membership test?" –  sparsity Jun 28 '13 at 5:17
    
This is called "big O notation", it is a way to represent the time complexity of an algorithm as the input size changes. So for example O(n) is linear, as the input size grows the run time will grow at a constant rate. O(1) is constant time, so "sets have O(1) membership test" means that even as the size of the set grows, it will always take a fixed time to see if an element exists in the set. –  Andrew Clark Jun 28 '13 at 5:35
    
Thank you, @F.J! –  sparsity Jun 28 '13 at 14:26
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Beautiful is better than ugly.

Your approach is perfectly fine. This is python, when there are a bajillion ways to do something. (Yours is more beautiful too :)). But if you really want it to be more pythonic and/or make it go faster, you could use a set, as F.J's answer has described.

The second solution just looks really hard to follow and understand.

(PS, dict is a built-in type. Don't override it :p. And string is a module from the standard library.)

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True but it is definitely possible to write a beautiful solution to this problem that runs faster than his –  aaronman Jun 28 '13 at 4:56
    
@aaronman I was actually comparing his to the second one –  Haidro Jun 28 '13 at 4:57
    
I know the second one is faster and uglier, I am saying that you can achieve elegance and speed in this case –  aaronman Jun 28 '13 at 4:58
    
@aaronman Yes, of course :)! –  Haidro Jun 28 '13 at 4:58
    
besides I think that the bit shifting solution is beautiful in a way –  aaronman Jun 28 '13 at 5:08
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Your solution is not incorrect but your variable dict is not actually a dictionary which means it has to do a linear search to check for the character. The solution from the book does the check in constant time. I will say that the other solution is obnoxiously unreadable because it uses setting the bits in a number to check if the char is unique or not

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The solution you have translated from Java into Python is what's called a 'bit-twiddling' algorithm. The idea is that an integer can be treated in multiple ways: One, as a number. Two, as a collection of bits (32 off/ons, or 64, or what-have-you). The algorithm bit-twiddles by saying each bit represents the presence or absense of a specific character - if the nth bit is 0, it sets it. If it's 1, the character that bit corresponds to already exists, so we know there are no unique characters.

However, unless you need the efficiency, avoid bit-twiddling algorithms, as they're not as self-evident in how they work as non-bit-twiddles.

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your implementation takes O(n2), author takes O(n). In your implementation, " if c in uchars:" , when it check if c in this array, it will have to go through the whole array, it takes time. So yours is not better than author's...

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