Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to test gcc preprocessor for its macro expansion.

I write following code: (just for testing)

#include <stdio.h>

#define QUOTE "
#define TMPL hello

int main(){
    printf(QUOTE TMPL QUOTE);
    return 0;
}

the compiling result is:

$ gcc main.c -o main
main.c:3:15: warning: missing terminating " character
main.c: In function ‘main’:
main.c:7: error: missing terminating " character
main.c:7: error: missing terminating " character
main.c:7: error: ‘hello’ undeclared (first use in this function)
main.c:7: error: (Each undeclared identifier is reported only once
main.c:7: error: for each function it appears in.)
main.c:7: warning: format not a string literal and no format arguments
main.c:7: warning: format not a string literal and no format arguments
$ 

Then I try to have a look at the preprocessed result

$ gcc -E main.c -o tmp.c
main.c:3:15: warning: missing terminating " character
$ 

Though giving a warning, it somehow produces correct preprocessed code in tmp.c

int main(){
 printf(" hello ");
 return 0;
}

And I compiler tmp.c, hello is correctly printed.

I'm wondering why gcc -E could produce correct code, while using gcc compiling directly failed. Is there difference between the two method of gcc preprocessor?

$ gcc --version
i686-apple-darwin11-llvm-gcc-4.2 (GCC) 4.2.1 (Based on Apple Inc. build 5658) (LLVM build 2336.11.00)
share|improve this question
    
A preprocessor macro should expand into a sequence of lexer tokens. So you can't have a macro like #define QUOTE "; BTW, your GCC version is very old, current one is 4.8 –  Basile Starynkevitch Jun 28 '13 at 4:55
1  
You want to google "c preprocessor stringize". –  ugoren Jun 28 '13 at 5:26
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As I commented, a preprocessor macro should expand into a sequence of lexer tokens. Withing GCC source code, the libcpp (in charge of preprocessing and tokenizing) is producing a stream of tokens (not plain chars). A recent GCC 4.8, when run as gcc -Wall endyul.c -o endyl on your example, gives quite helpful diagnostics:

endyul.c:3:15: warning: missing terminating " character [enabled by default]
 #define QUOTE "
               ^
endyul.c: In function 'main':
endyul.c:7:5: error: missing terminating " character
     printf(QUOTE TMPL QUOTE);
     ^
endyul.c:7:5: error: missing terminating " character
endyul.c:4:14: error: 'hello' undeclared (first use in this function)
 #define TMPL hello
              ^
endyul.c:7:18: note: in expansion of macro 'TMPL'
     printf(QUOTE TMPL QUOTE);
                  ^
endyul.c:4:14: note: each undeclared identifier is reported only once for each function it appears in
 #define TMPL hello
              ^
endyul.c:7:18: note: in expansion of macro 'TMPL'
     printf(QUOTE TMPL QUOTE);
                 ^

Your GCC 4.2 is very old. You should consider upgrading it.

And clang (3.3) gives also a good diagnostic:

 clang -Wall endyul.c -o endyul   
 endyul.c:3:15: warning: missing terminating '"' character [-Winvalid-pp-token]
 #define QUOTE "
               ^
 endyul.c:7:12: error: expected expression
     printf(QUOTE TMPL QUOTE);
            ^
 endyul.c:3:15: note: expanded from macro 'QUOTE'
 1 warning and 1 error generated.

Read again the CPP manual of GCC, notably the chapters on Stringification and Concatenation.

share|improve this answer
    
thx, but why gcc -E produces correct code? –  endyul Jun 28 '13 at 5:43
    
Because gcc -E don't produce code, but text, which happens to look correct (but is not). C preprocesssing is defined to produce a stream of tokens (in the previous century, old compilers before the C99 standard had preprocessors producing text; the standard mandates that preprocessing should produce tokens, not plain text). –  Basile Starynkevitch Jun 28 '13 at 5:48
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.