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Consider this method that works well:

public static bool mightBePrime(int N) {
    BigInteger a = rGen.Next (1, N-1);
    return modExp (a, N - 1, N) == 1;
}

Now, in order to fulfill a requirement of the class I'm taking, mightBePrime must accept a BigInteger N, but that means that I need a different way to generate my random BigInteger a.

My first idea was to do something like BigInteger a = (N-1) * rGen.NextDouble (), but a BigInteger can't be multiplied by a double.

How can I generate a random BigInteger between 1 and N-1 where N is a BigInteger?

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marked as duplicate by rene, msandiford, Ralph Willgoss, JasonMArcher, lpapp Mar 27 '14 at 2:31

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
There are a lot of results for random BigInteger C# on google. Do those not serve your purpose, and if not why not? –  Patashu Jun 28 '13 at 5:29
    
What if you generated it bitwise and then threw away all the generations that are too big? –  Paul Jun 28 '13 at 5:29
1  
Similar topic: stackoverflow.com/questions/2965707/… –  Dmitry Bychenko Jun 28 '13 at 5:43
1  
See ericlippert.com/2013/05/06/producing-permutations-part-seven for why you might not want to use System.Random. –  Michael Liu Jun 28 '13 at 15:01
1  
@svick: No, but the only part of that question that relates to security is the use of a secure random number generator. The main part of the question is how to use a random generator to get a BigInteger in a particular range. The answer to that is the same no matter what underlying RNG you use. –  Rasmus Faber Jun 28 '13 at 20:07

3 Answers 3

Use the Random-Class

public BigInteger getRandom(int length){
    Random random = new Random();
    byte[] data = new byte[length];
    random.NextBytes(data);
    return new BigInteger(data);
}
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How is a BigInteger an array (byte[])? This won't even compile. Perhaps you meant return new BigInteger(data)? –  spender Jun 28 '13 at 5:35
    
Sorry, my fault. I forgot that line. –  Marcel Singer Jun 28 '13 at 5:38
2  
This doesn't ensure it's within the range I care about, but it's close. I'll generate a random number using this method, and if it's not in my range, I'll throw it away and try again. –  Trevor Dixon Jun 28 '13 at 14:31
    
what about just take a Mod from it. Let's say you need number from a to b and this func returned x. You just need a + x.Abs().Mod(b - a). It's possible for BigInteger implementation in c# –  pkuderov Jun 28 '13 at 22:57
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Paul suggested in a comment that I generate a number using random bytes, then throw it away if it's too big. Here's what I came up with (Marcel's answer + Paul's advice):

public static BigInteger RandomIntegerBelow(BigInteger N) {
    byte[] bytes = N.ToByteArray ();
    BigInteger R;

    do {
        random.NextBytes (bytes);
        bytes [bytes.Length - 1] &= (byte)0x7F; //force sign bit to positive
        R = new BigInteger (bytes);
    } while (R >= N);

    return R;
}

http://amirshenouda.wordpress.com/2012/06/29/implementing-rsa-c/ helped a little too.

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3  
If this becomes too slow (in the worst case you would have to generate on average 256 values before you find one in the range), an alternative is to generate a larger number and return the remainder when dividing it with N. It will not be completely uniformly random, but the larger a number you generate (before dividing and taking remainder) the closer it gets to uniformly random. –  Rasmus Faber Jun 28 '13 at 17:58
1  
Why are you generating one more byte than necessary? Also, I think that using a do-while loop would make the code more DRY. –  svick Jun 28 '13 at 19:50
    
To answer your question, see stackoverflow.com/a/5649264/711902. "You can make sure any BigInteger created from a byte[] is unsigned if you append a 00 byte to the end of the array before calling the constructor." I'm generating one extra byte, then setting the last to 0. If I don't generate that extra byte, my max possible random integer is less than N. I forgot about do-while. I'll do that instead. –  Trevor Dixon Jun 28 '13 at 20:06
1  
@TrevorDixon Another approach would be just to reset the highest bit and not a whole byte: bytes[bytes.Length - 1] &= (byte)0x7F;. If you do that, you don't need the additional byte. –  svick Jun 28 '13 at 20:31
    
Oh good call. Thank you. Clearly I don't fully understand how these numbers are represented. –  Trevor Dixon Jun 28 '13 at 21:07

The following Range method will return an IEnumerable<BigInteger> within the range you specify. A simple Extension method will return a random element within the IEnumerable.

public static IEnumerable<BigInteger> Range(BigInteger from, BigInteger to)
{
    for(BigInteger i = from; i < to; i++) yield return i;
}

public static class Extensions
{
    public static BigInteger RandomElement(this IEnumerable<BigInteger> enumerable, Random rand)
    {
        int index = rand.Next(0, enumerable.Count());
        return enumerable.ElementAt(index);
    }
}

usage:

Random rnd = new Random();
var big = Range(new BigInteger(10000000000000000), new BigInteger(10000000000000020)).RandomElement(rnd);

// returns random values and in this case it was 10000000000000003

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Two problems: 1) Range only allows integer parameters. 2) Even if Range allowed BigInteger, this returns a sequence of all values in the range, in order. He wants a random number in the range from <= value < to. –  Jim Mischel Jun 28 '13 at 21:59

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