Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

From this page, I got to know that operator precedence of Bitwise AND is higher than Logical OR. However, the following program gives an unexpected output.

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
int a = 1;
int b = 2;
int c = 4;

if ( a++ || b++ & c++)
{
    cout <<a <<" " << b <<" " << c <<" " <<endl;
}
return 0;
}

The output is

 2 2 4

This means that logical OR works first. Does this mean that the operator precedence rule is violated here?

share|improve this question
    
you cout 3 variables but your output shows 4 numbers. Do you mean 2 2 4? –  Karthik T Jun 28 '13 at 6:25
    
@alk : Typo...Thanks for pointing out. –  user1414696 Jun 28 '13 at 6:27
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Precedence just means that the expression is written as below

  ( (a++ || (b++ & c++)))

Once you do that, short circuiting means that just the first expression is evaluated.

This is why a = 2 but b and c are unchanged.

codepad

share|improve this answer
1  
I was confusing precedence with associativity, I guess. Got it now. –  user1414696 Jun 28 '13 at 6:28
    
@user1414696 Or commutativity ... see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Associative_property –  Jim Balter Jun 28 '13 at 6:41
add comment

this link can help you :

http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/operator_precedence

precedence

10 & Bitwise AND
11 ^ Bitwise XOR (exclusive or)
12 | Bitwise OR (inclusive or)
13 && Logical AND
14 || Logical OR

this means that '&' is evaluated before '||'.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.