Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have this method I created :

 public static bool DeleteFile(FileInfo fileInfo)
    {
        try
        {
            fileInfo.Delete();
            return true;
        }
        catch (Exception exception)
        {
            LogManager.LogError(exception);
            return false;
        }
    }

Now I wrote the following unittest:

[TestMethod]
    public void DeleteFileSuccessFul()
    {
        string fileName = "c:\\Temp\\UnitTest3.txt";
        FileInfo fileInfo = new FileInfo(fileName);

        File.Create(Path.Combine(fileName));

        bool success = FileActions.DeleteFile(fileInfo);

        Assert.IsTrue(success);
    }

This test fails because the file is in use by a different proces. The test fails on het bool success = FileActions.DeleteFile(fileInfo); because the file is in use by a different process.

How can I change my test so it works ?

share|improve this question
    
I don't get it. You want your test to pass when the DeleteFile has failed? – Lieven Keersmaekers Jun 28 '13 at 7:11
    
I want my test to pass when the DeleteFile did not fail. (Sorry maybe that wasn't clear). I also tried creating the file with the fileInfo I defined but that didn't work either. – Bart Schelkens Jun 28 '13 at 7:12
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have to call Dispose method on the FileStream object returned by the File.Create method to release the handle to that file:

[TestMethod]
public void DeleteFileSuccessFul()
{
    string fileName = "c:\\Temp\\UnitTest3.txt";
    FileInfo fileInfo = new FileInfo(fileName);

    using (File.Create(Path.Combine(fileName)))
    {
    }

    bool success = FileActions.DeleteFile(fileInfo);

    Assert.IsTrue(success);
}

UPDATE: using block provides a convenient syntax that ensures the Dispose method of an IDisposable object is get called after leaving the scope of the block even if an exception occurs. The equivalent to the above code could be re-written with try-finally block:

[TestMethod]
public void DeleteFileSuccessFul()
{
    string fileName = "c:\\Temp\\UnitTest3.txt";
    FileInfo fileInfo = new FileInfo(fileName);

    FileStream fileStream = null;
    try
    {
        fileStream = File.Create(Path.Combine(fileName));
    }
    finally
    {
        if (fileStream != null)
            fileStream.Dispose();
    }

    bool success = FileActions.DeleteFile(fileInfo);

    Assert.IsTrue(success);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 but you migth want to add that it's by using using (pun intended), Dispose will get called. – Lieven Keersmaekers Jun 28 '13 at 7:17
    
@LievenKeersmaekers Thanks for your notation. The answer updated. – Alireza Maddah Jun 28 '13 at 7:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.