Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm new in haskell and I'm looking for some standard functions to work with lists by indexes.

My exact problem is that i want to remove 3 elements after every 5. If its not clear enough here is illustration:

OOOOOXXXOOOOOXXX...

I know how to write huge function with many parameters, but is there any clever way to do this?

share|improve this question
    
yes, g n m = map take m . takeWhile (not.null) . unfoldr (Just . splitAt (n+m)) and call it as g 3 5 "yourstring". import Data.List for the unfoldr. –  Will Ness Aug 17 at 13:49

7 Answers 7

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Two completely different approaches

  1. You can use List.splitAt together with drop:

    import Data.List (splitAt)
    f :: [a] -> [a]
    f [] = []
    f xs = let (h, t) = splitAt 5 xs in h ++ f (drop 3 t)
    

    Now f [1..12] yields [1,2,3,4,5,9,10,11,12]. Note that this function can be expressed more elegantly using uncurry and Control.Arrow.second:

    import Data.List (splitAt)
    import Control.Arrow (second)
    f :: [a] -> [a]
    f [] = []
    f xs = uncurry (++) $ second (f . drop 3) $ splitAt 5 xs
    

    Since we're using Control.Arrow anyway, we can opt to drop splitAt and instead call in the help of Control.Arrow.(&&&), combined with take:

    import Control.Arrow ((&&&))
    f :: [a] -> [a]
    f [] = []
    f xs = uncurry (++) $ (take 5 &&& (f . drop 8)) xs
    

    But now it's clear that an even shorter solution is the following:

    f :: [a] -> [a] 
    f [] = []
    f xs = take 5 xs ++ (f . drop 8) xs
    

    As Chris Lutz notes, this solution can then be generalized as follows:

    nofm :: Int -> Int -> [a] -> [a]
    nofm _ _ [] = []
    nofm n m xs = take n xs ++ (nofm n m . drop m) xs
    

    Now nofm 5 8 yields the required function. Note that a solution with splitAt may still be more efficient!

  2. Apply some mathematics using map, snd, filter, mod and zip:

    f :: [a] -> [a]
    f = map snd . filter (\(i, _) -> i `mod` 8 < (5 :: Int)) . zip [0..]
    

    The idea here is that we pair each element in the list with its index, a natural number i. We then remove those elements for which i % 8 > 4. The general version of this solution is:

    nofm :: Int -> Int -> [a] -> [a]
    nofm n m = map snd . filter (\(i, _) -> i `mod` m < n) . zip [0..]
    
share|improve this answer
    
+1 solution two is easily generalizable to NofM :: Int -> Int -> [a] -> [a] taking two arguments to put in place of 8 and 5, respectively. It also has the advantage of being quite clearly named. –  Chris Lutz Nov 15 '09 at 0:44

Since nobody did a version with "unfoldr", here is my take:

drop3after5 lst = concat $ unfoldr chunk lst
  where
    chunk [] = Nothing
    chunk lst = Just (take 5 lst, drop (5+3) lst)

Seems to be the shortest thus far

share|improve this answer
    
Concat function is needed to final result. –  qba Nov 15 '09 at 12:31
    
Yes, indeed, thank you –  ADEpt Nov 15 '09 at 15:34

You can count your elements easily:

strip' (x:xs) n | n == 7 = strip' xs 0
                | n >= 5 = strip' xs (n+1)
                | n < 5 = x : strip' xs (n+1)
strip l = strip' l 0

Though open-coding looks shorter:

strip (a:b:c:d:e:_:_:_:xs) = a:b:c:d:e:strip xs
strip (a:b:c:d:e:xs) = a:b:c:d:e:[]
strip xs = xs
share|improve this answer
    
I like the second version, but it's not generalizabe. Which is unfortunate, because it's possibly the clearest solution here. –  Chris Lutz Nov 15 '09 at 0:38
    
I like the pattern-matching solution. Simple as it can possibly be. Though you might need some more to match lists of less than eight elements. Can never remember how that works. –  Samir Talwar Nov 15 '09 at 0:39

the take and drop functions may be able to help you here.

drop, take :: Int -> [a] -> [a]

from these we could construct a function to do one step.

takeNdropM :: Int -> Int -> [a] -> ([a], [a])
takeNdropM n m list = (take n list, drop (n+m) list)

and then we can use this to reduce our problem

takeEveryNafterEveryM :: Int -> Int -> [a] -> [a]
takeEveryNafterEveryM n m [] = []
takeEveryNafterEveryM n m list = taken ++ takeEveryNafterEveryM n m rest
    where
        (taken, rest) = takeNdropM n m list

*Main> takeEveryNafterEveryM 5 3 [1..20]
[1,2,3,4,5,9,10,11,12,13,17,18,19,20]


since this is not a primitive form of recursion, it is harder to express this as a simple fold.

so a new folding function could be defined to fit your needs

splitReduce :: ([a] -> ([a], [a])) -> [a] -> [a]
splitReduce f []   = []
splitReduce f list = left ++ splitReduce f right
    where
        (left, right) = f list

then the definition of takeEveryNafterEveryM is simply

takeEveryNafterEveryM2 n m = splitReduce (takeNdropM 5 3)
share|improve this answer

This is my solution. It's a lot like @barkmadley's answer, using only take and drop, but with less clutter in my opinion:

takedrop :: Int -> Int -> [a] -> [a]
takedrop _ _ [] = []
takedrop n m l  = take n l ++ takedrop n m (drop (n + m) l)

Not sure if it'll win any awards for speed or cleverness, but I think it's pretty clear and concise, and it certainly works:

*Main> takedrop 5 3 [1..20]
[1,2,3,4,5,9,10,11,12,13,17,18,19,20]
*Main>
share|improve this answer
myRemove = map snd . filter fst . zip (cycle $ (replicate 5 True) ++ (replicate 3 False))
share|improve this answer

Here is my solution:

remElements step num=rem' step num
    where rem' _ _ []=[]
          rem' s n (x:xs)
              |s>0 = x:rem' (s-1) num xs
              |n==0 = x:rem' (step-1) num xs
              |otherwise= rem' 0 (n-1) xs

example:

*Main> remElements 5 3 [1..20]
[1,2,3,4,5,9,10,11,12,13,17,18,19,20]
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.