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Can anyone tell me how I refer to these, is the first a system managed object and the second a user managed object, whats the terminology I should be using in objective-c / cocoa to refer to each of these?

01

+(Planet *) planet {
    gPlanetCount++;
    return [[[self alloc] init] autorelease];
}

int main(int argc, const char * argv[]) {
    Planet *outerMost;
    outerMost = [[Planet planet] retain]; // With
    ...
    ... some code
    ...
    [outerMost release]; 
    [pool drain];
    return 0;
}

// OR

int main(int argc, const char * argv[]) {
    Planet *outerMost;
    outerMost = [Planet planet]; // Without
    ...
    ... some code
    ...
    [pool drain];
    return 0;
}

02

+(Planet *) newPlanet {
    gPlanetCount++;
    return [[self alloc] init];
}

int main(int argc, const char * argv[]) {
    Planet *outerMost;

    outerMost = [Planet newPlanet];
    ...
    ... some code
    ...
    [outerMost release];
    [pool drain];
    return 0;
}

EDIT_001

So with the first example I would need to have something like this (text moved to 01 at the top)

EDIT_002

"Code cleaned up, revised final question below ..."

I am going to go with 01 (given that its the more usual way) can I ask again about the retain/release (i.e. if they are needed) this compiles and runs through the static analyser both with and without them?

gary

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Both of your main functions are implicitly typed as returning int, but you don't return anything. This is why implicit int is bad. You should turn on the “Mismatched Return Type” warning to have the compiler warn you when you do this, and you should declare the functions' return types (as void) explicitly. –  Peter Hosey Nov 15 '09 at 7:26
    
Hi peter, I was aware of that, I just missed that out for speed, I will edit the code to be correct. –  fuzzygoat Nov 15 '09 at 10:36
    
Can I ask which example in 01 is better, or is it that the first (with) is better in more complex situations, but without is fine for a small example as presented? –  fuzzygoat Nov 15 '09 at 12:42
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In your first example, the result of +planet is autoreleased. Thus the caller must call -retain on the result if it wants to maintain a reference to the result. +planet is the more common pattern (although +[NSObject new] exists, it's much more common in Cocoa-land to use and alloc/init pair or a convenience constructor like your +planet (which returns an autoreleased instance according to the Cocoa memory management rules).

In both examples, the result of +planet/+newPlanet is an instance of the Planet class. There's no difference in terminology, but documentation of the (correct) first example might be explicit in stating the that the result is "autoreleased" even though the standard Cocoa memory management conventions would dictate that the result be autoreleased.

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1  
As the second contains "new" I was assuming that calling outerMost = [Planet newPlanet]; followed at some point by [outerMost release]; would be correct as per the management rules? –  fuzzygoat Nov 15 '09 at 0:26
    
Ooops. I didn't see the new in your second example. It is correct according to the management rules. I'll fix my answer. –  Barry Wark Nov 15 '09 at 0:46
1  
In Objective-C, you don't call methods, you send messages. The way this should be stated is, "Thus, the caller must send the result a -retain message". –  NSResponder Nov 15 '09 at 0:47
    
@NSResponder You're correct. I find many Cocoa developers shorten "send the X message" to call X. Feel free to edit my post to make things more exact! –  Barry Wark Nov 15 '09 at 3:55
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The actual object coming out of these methods is simply a Planet object instance, as Barry Wark says in his answer. However, the first method (+planet) would probably be referred to as a "convenience constructor".

EDIT_001

As I understand it, an autoreleased object will stay around for the duration of the method/function it was created in. You only need to retain the object if you want it to stay around longer than that.

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An autoreleased object will stay around until the enclosing autorelease pool is drained/released. If you explicitly create one within a method, then this is the enclosing pool. Otherwise, the enclosing pool is either in a method lower in the call stack. Usually the enclosing pool will be drained at the end of the current NSRunLoop iteration. –  Barry Wark Nov 15 '09 at 0:45
    
Ah ok I see, so as I am creating the object within the scope of main() I don't need to add the retain/release as it gets a +1 release count from the alloc (matched by the autorelease) when its created which in turn is disposed of correctly when main exits and drains the pool. –  fuzzygoat Nov 15 '09 at 0:48
    
"An autoreleased object will stay around until the enclosing autorelease pool is drained/released." No. The autorelease pool is nothing but a delayed messaging mechanism. When you send -autorelease to an object, it will receive a -release message when the current pool is drained or released. That is ALL it means. The object in question may get destroyed before that, causing a memory error, or it may persist afterwards, if the -release message didn't take its retain count down to zero. –  NSResponder Nov 15 '09 at 0:51
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