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I want to create a regular expression for strings which uses special characters [ and ].

Value is "[action]".

Expression I am using is "[\\[[\\x00-\\x7F]+\\]]".

I tried doing it by adding \\ before [ and ].

But it doesn't work.

Can any one help me with this.

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

You probably want to remove the enclosing brackets "[]". In regexps they mean a choice of one of the enclosed characters

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1  
Like this, it would seem: "\\[[\\x00-\\x7F]+\\]". – Gunslinger47 Nov 15 '09 at 0:24

Two backslashes before the open and close brackets: \\[ and \\]

The double backslash evaluates a single backslash in the string. The single backslash escapes the brackets so that they are not interpreted as surrounding a character class.

No backslashes for the brackets that do declare the character class: [a-z] (you can you any range you like, not just a to z)

The Kleene star operator matches any number of characters in the range.

public class Regexp {
    public static void main(final String... args) {
        System.out.println("[action]".matches("\\[[a-z]*\\]"));
    }
}

On my system:

$ javac Regexp.java && java Regexp
true
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Just stick one backslash before the square bracket.

Two backslashes escapes itself, so the regex engine sees \[, where [ is a special char.

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This is a Java string literal, so he needs double backslashes in order for the "regex engine" to see a single backslash. – Laurence Gonsalves Nov 15 '09 at 1:49
    
Ah right, my bad, I guess I'm used to typing regexes in a C# verbatim string. – anonymous coward Nov 15 '09 at 6:34

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