Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm reading a C++ book (I've programmed in C before), it's called C++ Primer 5th edition. I found it on a post with all stackoverflow's recommended books. When we start learning classes, it shows something like this (not exactly):

Class1 c1, c2;
cin >> c1 >> c2;
if(c1.getName() == c2.getName()){
    cout << c1 + c2 << endl;
}

Does this make sense? What's in the classes doesn't matter I just want to know if there is any class where that would be possible and if there is could you give me an example? Imagine if each class had a name and a number (string getName(), int getNumber()), when you use cin what would happen? And when you use cout of c1? What does c1+c2 mean? Thanks, I hope you can help me!

Edit: Oh and btw, in Java we use c1.getName().equals(c2.getName()) to compare strings, is that needed in C++?

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by jogojapan, nijansen, Kerrek SB, WiSaGaN, TooTone Apr 4 at 13:58

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question appears to be off-topic because it lacks sufficient information to diagnose the problem. Describe your problem in more detail or include a minimal example in the question itself." – Kerrek SB, WiSaGaN, TooTone
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Operator overloading –  user529758 Jun 28 '13 at 9:17
4  
You should probably read further into the book - you are getting ahead of yourself a bit. It will almost certainly explain what this means later on. –  Caribou Jun 28 '13 at 9:21
    
You don't need equals in C++, just ==, unlike Java and C# –  doctorlove Jun 28 '13 at 9:30
    
Thank you guys. You're right Caribou, I understand that now haha. –  SadSeven Jun 28 '13 at 9:41
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Does this make sense?

It could.

What's in the classes doesn't matter I just want to know if there is any class where that would be possible and if there is could you give me an example? Imagine if each class had a name and a number (string getName(), int getNumber()), when you use cin what would happen?

The code assumes >> is defined to get values for the fields, such as could be done with...

std::istream& operator>>(std::istream&, Class1& x)
{
    return is >> x.name_ >> x.number_;
}

Sadly, the code doesn't check if the conversion succeeds (i.e. the input can be parsed into strings and numbers as hoped. Better code would be:

Class1 c1, c2;
if (cin >> c1 >> c2)
    if(c1.getName() == c2.getName())
        cout << c1 + c2 << endl;

Say you type "hello 20 goodbye 30" -> you'd end up with c1's fields set to "hello" and 20 respectively, and obvious c2 set to "goodbye" and 30.

And when you use cout of c1?

If you stream c1, the output is determined by the operator you create. A simple implementation would be:

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const Class1& c)
{
    return os << c.name_ << ' ' << c.number_;
}

What does c1+c2 mean? Thanks, I hope you can help me!

This means whatever a matching function tells it to mean, for example - you might like:

Class1 operator+(const Class1& lhs, const Class1& rhs)
{
    return Class1(lhs.name_ + rhs.name_, lhs.number_ + rhs.number_);
}

Or, you might want to concatenate digits so number_ 7 and 23 make 723... whatever makes sense in the context of your program.

Edit: Oh and btw, in Java we use c1.getName().equals(c2.getName()) to compare strings, is that needed in C++?

Normally we create a comparison function so we can use ==:

bool operator==(const Class1& lhs, const Class1& rhs)
{
    return lhs.name_ == rhs.name_ && lhs.number_ == rhs.number_;
}

Of course, you can do things like ignore case differences, consider "Anthony" and "Tony" to be equivalent etc..

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the very clear answer! I couldn't do that myself at this level, but at least I understand it and that's all I wanted right now. I think you didn't understand my last question but it's okay, someone else answered it. –  SadSeven Jun 28 '13 at 9:42
add comment

What you are asking is nothing but operator overloading. c1 and c2 are objects of Class1. Here Extraction operator(>>) and + operator has been overloaded.

Check this out:-

Operator Overloading in C++

Example of a class overloading >> and << operator:-

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Distance
{
   private:
      int feet;             // 0 to infinite
      int inches;           // 0 to 12
   public:
      // required constructors
      Distance(){
         feet = 0;
         inches = 0;
      }
      Distance(int f, int i){
         feet = f;
         inches = i;
      }
      friend ostream &operator<<( ostream &output, 
                                       const Distance &D )
      { 
         output << "F : " << D.feet << " I : " << D.inches;
         return output;            
      }

      friend istream &operator>>( istream  &input, Distance &D )
      { 
         input >> D.feet >> D.inches;
         return input;            
      }
};
int main()
{
   Distance D1(11, 10), D2(5, 11), D3;

   cout << "Enter the value of object : " << endl;
   cin >> D3;
   cout << "First Distance : " << D1 << endl;
   cout << "Second Distance :" << D2 << endl;
   cout << "Third Distance :" << D3 << endl;


   return 0;
}

Source:- http://www.tutorialspoint.com/cplusplus/input_output_operators_overloading.htm

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I would give you a "useful answer" if I could lol... Whoever wrote that example is a perv, I mean... D.inches... really? Jk hehe –  SadSeven Jun 28 '13 at 9:46
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.