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I want to develop a node.js app with express. The application is going to support multiple access levels. All users will be authenticated through username & password. The authentication method that I've been using until now is the following:

  1. The user is been authenticated by username & password
  2. Having installed express with session support I use the request.session object in order to store all the user's info and credentials and I check against it every time a new call comes in to the server from the same user

How secure is this process? Does it use cookies? Does it have vulnerabilities? Is it more secure to control sessions through websockets and socket.io or any other different way? Thanks in advance

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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Session in express will use cookies if you will setup so. It will exchange long key that is used in order to trigger session restore on server side.
Session data on server side is not shared with client through cookies. You can verify this in response Headers of a request to page with session enabled on server side.
Socket.IO have ability to restore session data during handshake process as it starts as normal HTTP request and does exchange cookie as well which is used to verify identity of user additionally to another validations for session restoring.

This is well efficient and secure to do as far as stolen cookies will not give ability to access from another remote end point and browser.

In order to make different user types with different access restriction I've used middleware functions that are very handy in routes declaration.
From coding point of view they might look like that:

var userTypes = {
  any: function(types) {
    return function(req, res, next) {
      if (types.indexOf(req.session.user.type) != -1) {
        return next();
      } else {
        return next(new Error('permission denied'));
      }
    }
  },
  is: function(type) {
    return function(req, res, next) {
      if (req.session.user.type == type) {
        return next();
      } else {
        return next(new Error('permission denied'));
      }
    }
  }
}

app.get('/items', userTypes.any([ 'developer', 'admin' ]), function(req, res, next) {
  // will execute if user type is developer or admin
});

app.use(function(err, req, res, next) {
  console.log(err);
  res.send(err);
});

Middleware is same function as last function that accepts req, res and next, so you can have access to session data from it and can call next() in case if valid, or next(new Error('reason')); that will not continue chain of middleware to last function, but will pop out to route that handles errors.
If you have chain of routes that should try to fallback, then instead of returning next(new Error()); you might want to have flag of allowed in req somewhere, and then check in last route callback to check if it is allowed if not - call next() that will try to find another route that suits the query.

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Thanks. Very nice the any/is example. I'll totally use it. Though I didn't understand to which method you refer to by "This is well efficient and secure to do as far as stolen cookies will not give ability to access from another remote end point and browser". You mentioned session and socket.io. Please correct me if I understood wrong. You mean that the standard method described on my initial question is OK as far as I don't use cookies on the session of express? –  Andreas Trantidis Jun 28 '13 at 10:48
    
Regarding express session store - it is private to node.js, and will not be shared via cookies or so. Although there will be cookie with long 'hashed id' in order to restore session securely (this happens behind the scenes in node). It is totally fine to store temporary data regarding present session in session object. It would be almost the same, if you would store it yourself in object with key as session.id. Although do not store passwords in session. Passwords should never go out of database by logic of your application. –  moka Jun 28 '13 at 12:56
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