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I was using this code with some actual coding that requires all of the variables in the enclosing loops. I was thinking that if the range over which iteration has to take place is same there has to be a another way with less indentation and same access to all the variables.

Is there an alternative to such nested loops which has

  • less indentation
  • access to the variable in the same order in the enclosed scope

The code:

import itertools
import time

#My Way
s = time.time()
sums_pyramid = [0] * 36
for i in xrange(1,5):
    for j in xrange(1,5):
        for k in xrange(1,5):
            for l in xrange(1,5):
                for m in xrange(1,5):
                    for n in xrange(1,5):
                        for o in xrange(1,5):
                            for p in xrange(1,5):
                                for q in xrange(1,5):
                                    sums_pyramid[i+j+k+l+m+n+o+p+q - 1] += 1
print (time.time() - s)


#Lattyware's suggested way
s = time.time()
sums_pyramid = [0] * 36
for i,j,k,l,m,n,o,p,q in itertools.product(xrange(1,5), repeat = 9):
    sums_pyramid[i+j+k+l+m+n+o+p+q - 1] += 1
print (time.time() - s)

The timing results

#My way
0.259999990463
#Lattyware's suggested way
0.310000181198

EDIT2:

After Lattyware suggested that instead of using time module I should use timeit module I got these results

The new code:

import itertools

def p():
    #My Way
    sums_pyramid = [0] * 36
    for i in xrange(1,5):
        for j in xrange(1,5):
            for k in xrange(1,5):
                for l in xrange(1,5):
                    for m in xrange(1,5):
                        for n in xrange(1,5):
                            for o in xrange(1,5):
                                for p in xrange(1,5):
                                    for q in xrange(1,5):
                                        sums_pyramid[i+j+k+l+m+n+o+p+q - 1] += 1


def q():
    #Lattyware's suggested way
    sums_pyramid = [0] * 36
    for i,j,k,l,m,n,o,p,q in itertools.product(xrange(1,5), repeat = 9):
        sums_pyramid[i+j+k+l+m+n+o+p+q - 1] += 1

if __name__ == '__main__':
    times = 10
    from timeit import Timer
    print Timer(p, 'gc.enable()').timeit(number = times)

    print Timer(q, 'gc.enable()').timeit(number = times)

New timings:

1.60324387493
1.28266455309

These show that Lattyware's code is better.

share|improve this question
2  
The issue was the code directly following the list - indentation after a list element is used for something else in markdown, apparently. Edited to fix. –  Lattyware Jun 28 '13 at 10:01
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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Assuming that (as in your example) the loops are all independent of the parent loops, You want itertools.product().

import itertools

for i, j, k, l, m, n, o, p, q in itertools.product(xrange(1, 5), repeat=9):
    ...

Here I use the repeat keyword argument as shorthand, as in your example, the iterables were all the same, but you can also pass it multiple iterables if your iterables are not all the same.

It will also be more efficient than many nested loops. Do note that there is likely a better solution to your problem - as iterating with so many nested loops is likely to be a huge amount of iteration, and therefore very slow.

Alternatively, if your loops rely on their parent loops or the like (and as such product() isn't suitable), you can define functions to take some of the heavy nesting and abstract it out.

for i in xrange(1,5):
    for j in xrange(1,5):
        for k in xrange(1,5):
            for l in xrange(1,5):
                for m in xrange(1,5):
                    inner_loops(i, j, k, l, m)

def inner_loops(i, j, k, l, m):
    for n in xrange(1,5):
        for o in xrange(1,5):
            for p in xrange(1,5):
                for q in xrange(1,5):
                    pass

This will perform worse than product(), and is less readable, but may be necessary, depending on the situation. Naturally you can use as many functions as needed where needed to reduce the nesting as much as needed.

As a final note, I assume that you are using ranges as a simple example, but if you are planning to loop over data structures using indices, don't! It's hard to read, inflexible and slow. Loop directly over the data structure itself - these methods will work fine (in fact, better) that way.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. It definitely helped me in improving the readability of the code and much less typing. About efficiency, your suggestion is slightly less efficient. I'll update the question to include the timing results. –  Aseem Bansal Jun 28 '13 at 10:16
    
If by efficiency, you mean speed, that shouldn't be the case - product() iterates at a lower level, in C code (assuming you are using CPython), while normal loops have more overhead as they are a Python structure. product() should be faster in any case where the timing is non-trivial. –  Lattyware Jun 28 '13 at 10:17
    
I updated the question to include timings. –  Aseem Bansal Jun 28 '13 at 10:20
    
@Zel The issue is probably with your timing code - use the timeit module instead. –  Lattyware Jun 28 '13 at 10:26
    
Ok the results with timeit module favored your results and I see that this module is specifically for measuring execution time. What about time module? –  Aseem Bansal Jun 28 '13 at 10:39
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