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My function test is added to two different .cpp-files and the functions are private to their respective files as shown below

test1.cpp

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

void test()
{
    cout << "test" << endl;
}

test2.cpp

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

void test()
{
    cout << "test" << endl;
}

main.cpp

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;



int main()
{

    return 0;
}

During linking I get the error multiple definition of test() - but how is that possible, considering that the two files have their own private scope!? I could understand it if I included the function prototype in each .cpp-files' corresponding header, but there is no such thing in this example.

share|improve this question

You need the inline keyword for that:

inline void test()
{
    cout << "test" << endl;
}

This allows you to have multiple definitions in separate source files without violating the one-definition rule. However, note that the function still has external linkage and they will all resolve to the same address. Also:

An inline function shall be defined in every translation unit in which it is odr-used and shall have exactly the same definition in every case

If you want separate functions with different addresses (internal linkage), use the static keyword instead.

share|improve this answer

Both test functions are in the same global namespace of the program. In order to avoid error you may: 1) wrap any or both functions in namespace:

namespace A
{
void test()
{
   ...
}
}

2) use static keyword 3) just rename one of them

share|improve this answer

To elaborate on above answers:

In C++, function declarations can be repeated as many times as you want. A function definition however (i.e. the function body), can occur only once.

When creating your binary, the compiler compiles each file to a obj file so in your example you end up with test1.obj, test2.obj and main.obj. After all files compiled successfully, the linker links them together to create your executable. This is where multiple definitions for the same function are found and why linking fails.

Depending on what you want, you can do the following to resolve this:

  • If you want multiple different functions with the same name, then you have to disambiguate them. C++ wouldn't be C++ if you only had one way to do this:

    1. The old c way: use the static keyword
    2. Use an anonymous namespace
    3. Use a namespace
  • If you want only one function:

    1. Separate the definition from the declaration, i.e. put the declaration in a header file and move the definition to a source file.
    2. Define the function as inline in a header
share|improve this answer

Add static in each test function.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

static
void test()
{
    cout << "test" << endl;
}
share|improve this answer

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