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Could it be possible to have a glossy button rather then the default light blue button in VBA Excel Macro?

Example: Here I have shiny glossy button, can this be used in VBA?
Instead of this.

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does excel allow for custom ocx controls? – Lefteris E Jun 28 '13 at 10:37
    
@LefterisE Yes, it does. Oh, you mean creating an OCX? No, it does not. It will use an existing OCX. – GSerg Jun 28 '13 at 10:38
    
@GSerg : Thanku .. Will it be possible to use the glossy buttons ? – user1627561 Jun 28 '13 at 11:04
    
So the solution would be to create an OCX in vb6, and use that in VBA – Lefteris E Jun 28 '13 at 11:08

Buttons are boring!

You can copy your better-looking objects to a worksheet as Pictures or Shapes. You can then assign macros to these objects or assign hyperlinks to the objects, etc.

Perhaps not as powerful as ActiveX, put still useful and with improved visual impact!

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The ActiveX controls can also be a pain when distributing an application, as they may not be correctly registered on another computer. They do have many features though. – Andy G Jun 28 '13 at 12:28

It's a bit of work, but it can be done. As Gary's Student suggested, you can use pictures (via two image controls). Go to this site (http://www.glassybuttons.com/glassy.php) and design a button how it is appropriate for your situation and download it.

Using the two .jpg images, you need to wire up a few events:

1) Set the image you want to use as the default button image to the picture property of the Image1 control. Size Image1 to be as close as possible to the size of your button and set the BorderStyle to be None

2) Set the image you want to use as the mouseover button image to the picture property of the Image2 control. Again, size Image2 to be as close as possible to the size of your button and set the BorderStyle to be None

3) Use a blank image control as the background base. Make the control a bit larger than the size of your button images. Overlay the two image controls (so they both have the same .Top and .Left property values) and are on top of the Image3 (the background image).

3a) Note, it's important that Image1 be on top to start (you can use the Order option to send the Image2 to be behind Image1 if it is on top). Both images should be on top of Image3.

4) Use the MouseMove event of Image1 like so:

Private Sub Image1_MouseMove(ByVal Button As Integer, ByVal Shift As Integer, ByVal X As Single, ByVal Y As Single)
    Image1.Visible = False
    Image2.Visible = True
End Sub

5) Use the MouseMove event of Image3 like so:

Private Sub Image3_MouseMove(ByVal Button As Integer, ByVal Shift As Integer, ByVal X As Single, ByVal Y As Single)
    Image1.Visible = True
    Image2.Visible = False
End Sub

6) Set the image click event of Image2 to do whatever you want the button to do.

Again, it is a bit of work, but it does make for a nice visual if you take the time to set it up. Also, you can mess with the "SpecialEffect" of Image2 to give a sense that the button is being pressed.

I'd be more than happy to post my sample workbook demonstrating the above steps if someone can recommend an easy and public sharing file hosting site.

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try this Active X user control as suggested in this video. not sure if it can be added in the worksheet tho. It may also require the vb6 runtimes. It sounds like a lot of trouble, not sure it's worth it... also see

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