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If

A = [1 2 3; 4 5 6; 7 8 9]

B = [1 2 2]

I found that

  • A(B == 1, :) returns [1 2 3] and
  • A(B == 2, :) returns [4 5 6; 7 8 9]

because

  • B == 1 returns [1 0 0] and
  • B == 2 returns [0 1 1]

Given the above examples for A and B is there any easier way to get both the final matrices [1 2 3] and [4 5 6; 7 8 9] in one step i.e. without using a for loop.

Objective is to generate centroids of clusters to which each example(row in A) has been assigned in a K-means clustering problem. I am thinking of passing the resulting matrices to mean() function to generate the centroids.

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What do you mean by get? I can see you want to generalise this, but it's not clear what you want to generalise it to. Do you want to pass in an array of indices and get back an array of arrays? –  Stefan Jun 28 '13 at 11:41
    
Yes.Objective is to generate centroids of clusters to which each example(row in A) has been assigned in a K-means clustering problem. I am thinking of passing the resulting matrices to mean() function to generate the centroids. –  sandeepkunkunuru Jun 28 '13 at 11:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can get a cell array

A = [1 2 3; 4 5 6; 7 8 9];
B = [1 2 2];    
arrayfun(@(lev) A(B==lev, :), unique(B), 'UniformOutput', false)

returns

ans = 
{
  [1,1] =

     1   2   3

  [1,2] =

     4   5   6
     7   8   9

}
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Thanks. that works :-). I had to change it slightly to get the means. arrayfun(@(lev) mean(A(B==lev, :), 1), unique(B), 'UniformOutput', false) –  sandeepkunkunuru Jun 28 '13 at 15:53

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