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I am wondering if what I am trying to achieve is actually possible at all, I do not know the exact name of what I am doing hence why I cannot really properly google for results and why this topic title is also kind of vague.

My classes:

AccountConstraint.java:

package dao.constraint;

public class AccountConstraint {
    private Range<Integer> accountId;
    private String username;
    private String password;
    private String email;

    public AccountConstraint(final Range<Integer> accountId, final String username, final String password, final String email) {
        this.accountId = accountId;
        this.username = username;
        this.password = password;
        this.email = email;
    }

    public Range<Integer> getAccountId() {
        return accountId;
    }

    public String getUsername() {
        return username;
    }

    public String getPassword() {
        return password;
    }

    public String getEmail() {
        return email;
    }
}

Range.java:

package dao.constraint;

public class Range<T> {
    private T min;
    private T max;

    public Range(T min, T max) {
        this.min = min;
        this.max = max;
    }

    public T getMin() {
        return min;
    }

    public T getMax() {
        return max;
    }
}

A perfectly valid code example would be:

AccountConstraint ac = new AccountConstraint(new Range<Integer>(5, 10), null, null, null));

If you would want to get all accounts with id 5 to 10. A still valid, but weirder piece of code would be:

AccountConstraint ac = new AccountConstraint(new Range<Integer>(3, 3), null, null, null));

if you would want to get the account with id 3.

What I would like is:

AccountConstraint ac = new AccountConstraint(3, null, null, null);

as new Range<Integer>(3, 3) is theoretically equal to 3.

Is there a way to do this, possibly via adding code to the Range class, I kind of feel like this should be possible, but I got no clue how and/or where to start.

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7 Answers

I have managed to get it working, though I would like to know if this approach is actually wanted: It would save me time on not having to make so many constructor paths.

public AccountConstraint(Object... argument) {
    if (argument.length != 4) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("dao.constraint.AccountConstraint: argument.length != 4: argument.length = " + argument.length);
    }
    if (argument[0] instanceof Integer) {
        argument[0] = new Range<>(argument[0]);
    }        
    this.accountId = (Range<Integer>)argument[0];
    this.username = (String)argument[1];
    this.password = (String)argument[2];
    this.email = (String)argument[3];
}

This constructor now accepts both Range's and Integer's and I've confirmed that it works.

Alternative solution, might be nicer?

public AccountConstraint(Object accountId, final String username, final String password, final String email) {
    if (accountId instanceof Integer) {
        accountId = new Range<>(accountId);
    }
    this.accountId = (Range<Integer>)accountId;
    this.username = username;
    this.password = password;
    this.email = email;
}

Both work pefectly.

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You could change your Range class to add a single parameter constructor:

public Range(T t) {
    min = t;
    max = t;
}

And call that constructor in a separate AccountConstraint constructor.


Incidentally, your Range class could benefit from some type bounding:

public class Range<T extends Comparable<T>> {
    public boolean contains(T value) {
        return value.compareTo(min) >= 0 
          && value.compareTo(max) <= 0;
    }
    // rest of class the same 
}
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Create a constructor like this. Pass the value to the constructor

   public AccountConstraint(Integer i, final String username, final String password, final String email) {
            this.accountId = new Range<Integer>(i,i)
            this.username = username;
            this.password = password;
            this.email = email;
        }
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You can try this (Creating a new overloaded constructor):

public AccountConstraint(final Range<Integer> accountId, final String username, final String password, final String email) {
      this.accountId = accountId;
      this.username = username;
      this.password = password;
      this.email = email;
}

//new overloaded constructor
public AccountConstraint(Integer value, final String username, final String password, final String email) {
      Range<Integer> accountId = new Range(value,value);
      super(accountId , username, password, email));
}
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Add a constructor taking an Integer as first argument and create a Range with it:

public AccountConstraint(Integer accountId, final String username, final String password, final String email) {
    this(new Range<Integer>(accountId, accountId), username, password, email);
}
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Create more constructors:

public AccountConstraint(Integer accountId, final String username, final String password, final String email) {
    this.accountId = new Range<Integer>(accountId);
    this.username = username;
    this.password = password;
    this.email = email;
}

public Range(T num) {
    this.min = num;
    this.max = num;
}
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You don't need to do anything about your Range class, simply provide another AccountConstraint constructor which makes a Range out of one int:

public AccountConstraint(final int accountId, final String username, final String password, final String email) {
    this(new Range<Integer>(accountId, accountId), username, password, email);
}
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The amount of work would really be a lot if you would have multiple arguments accepting the Range variant and a normal variant. If you would have 4 of those integer values, then you would need 2^3 = 8 different constructors already. That is what I am trying to avoid. –  skiwi Jun 28 '13 at 12:05
1  
@skiwi If you have so many construction paths, you're probably better off with a builder. Then, you only need to provide two overloads per argument method, e.g. setAccountId(Range<Integer) and setAccountId(int). –  Mattias Buelens Jun 28 '13 at 12:09
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