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I looking to create a method that can do the following thing:

string? s = xelement.GetValue < string > ( "elementname" );
Guid? g = xelement.GetValue < Guid > ( "elementname" );
int? i = xelement.GetValue < int > ( "elementname" );
DateTime? d = xelement.GetValue < DateTime > ( "elementname" );

is it possible?

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1  
No, you cannot have a string?. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jun 28 '13 at 12:15
    
why we have string.IsNullOrEmpty ? –  Salvatore Di Fazio Jun 28 '13 at 12:16
2  
String is a reference type and so it can have a null value already. Therefore, Nullable<String> wouldn't make sense as Nullable<> is designed to make value types nullable. –  keyboardP Jun 28 '13 at 12:16
2  
You can alter it so you call .GetValue<Guid?>, GetValue<int?> etc. Or have two different methods: one for structs and one for reference classes. –  Chris Sinclair Jun 28 '13 at 12:16

4 Answers 4

I'm afraid you will have to create 2 separate methods. In order to return Nullable<T>, you need the struct constraint, which prevents reference types from being used.

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Isn't Nullable<T> in itself a type? So you could just create GetValue<T> where sometimes T is in fact sometimes Nullable<U>? –  Davio Jun 28 '13 at 12:19
    
@Davio it is... –  Daniel A. White Jun 28 '13 at 12:33

Try this extension method will work with string, int and DateTime, because all these types are supported by IConvertable interface. Thus you can convert string to bool, byte, char, decimal, etc (except Guid):

public static T GetValue<T>(this XElement element, string name)
{
    string value = (string)element.Element(name);
    return (T)Convert.ChangeType(value, typeof(T));
}

BTW there is no Nullable<string> in C#, because nullable can accept only value types. So you should use simple string.


Usage:

<rooot>
  <string>hello</string>
  <int>42</int>
  <guid>0FFF30ED-0C4B-41ED-9CDA-D9E084FAD6F2</guid>
  <date>06/27/2013</date>
</rooot>

Parsing:

XDocument xdoc = XDocument.Load(path_to_xml);
XElement root = xdoc.Root;
string s = root.GetValue<string>("string");
int? i = root.GetValue<int>("int");
DateTime? d = root.GetValue<DateTime>("date");

If you want guids to be supported also, then you can manually parse them:

public static T GetValue<T>(this XElement element, string name)
{
    string value = (string)element.Element(name);    

    Type targetType =  typeof(T);
    if (targetType == typeof(Guid))
        return (T)(object)Guid.Parse(value);

    var typeConverter = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(targetType);

    if (typeConverter == null || !typeConverter.CanConvertFrom(typeof(string)))
        return default(T); // or throw exception

    return (T)typeConverter.ConvertFrom(value);
}

UPDATE OK, if you want to return nullable value from method, then (remember, strings are not value types, so you can't parametrize method with string):

public static Nullable<T> GetValue<T>(this XElement element, string name)
    where T : struct
{
    string value = (string)element.Element(name);
    if (value == null)
        return null;

    Type targetType =  typeof(T);
    if (targetType == typeof(Guid))
        return (T)(object)Guid.Parse(value);

    var typeConverter = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(targetType);

    if (typeConverter == null || !typeConverter.CanConvertFrom(typeof(string)))
        return null; // or throw exception

    return (T)typeConverter.ConvertFrom(value);
}
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I must be missing something. Won't calling GetValue<int> never return a null value? That is, isn't the usage that you have there simply returning an int and converting it to int? when assigned with int? i = ? –  Chris Sinclair Jun 28 '13 at 12:38
    
@ChrisSinclair null value is not required. You can assign int to int? See method generic parameters - they are not nullable in question. Or maybe I'm missing something –  Sergey Berezovskiy Jun 28 '13 at 12:46
    
My impression was that Salvatore Di Fazio wanted to specify an int type and have it return null if the element wasn't found or some other exceptional case. That is, specify the underlying type int for T and have it return T?. EDIT: Of course, the actual intent of what he's trying to do is not clear at all; it'd be nice to have better context as to what he's wanting to do. –  Chris Sinclair Jun 28 '13 at 12:53
    
@ChrisSinclair OK, I understand your point. Updated answer with returning nullable types –  Sergey Berezovskiy Jun 28 '13 at 12:58

You can use the "Null object" pattern. Here

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I tested this in LinqPad (my go-to quick C# sandbox) and it works:

    void Main()
{
    string s = GetValue<string>("elementname");
    Guid? g = GetValue<Guid?>("elementname");
    Guid h = GetValue<Guid>("elementname");
    int? i = GetValue<int?>("elementname");
    int j = GetValue<int>("elementname");
    DateTime? d = GetValue<DateTime?>("elementname");
    DateTime e = GetValue<DateTime>("elementname");

    Console.WriteLine(s);
    Console.WriteLine(g);
    Console.WriteLine(h);
    Console.WriteLine(i);
    Console.WriteLine(j);
    Console.WriteLine(d);
    Console.WriteLine(e);
}

T GetValue<T>(string elementName)
{
    return default(T);
}

Output:

null 
null 
00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000
null 
0
null 
1-1-0001 00:00:00
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