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#include <iostream>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>

using namespace std;

int twoify(int num, int times)
{
    num *= 2;
    if (times > 0)
    {
    	times--;
    	return twoify(num, times);
    }
    return num;
}

int main()
{
    srand(time(NULL));
    const int BET = 1;
    const int TIMES = 100000;
    const int CHANCE = 50;

    int wins = 0;
    int losses = 0;
    int wstreak = 0;
    int lstreak = 0;
    int cwstreak = 0;
    int clstreak = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < TIMES; i++)
    {
    	int num = rand() % 100 + 1;
    	if (num <= CHANCE) // win?
    	{
    		wins++;
    		cwstreak++;
    		clstreak = 0;
    		if (cwstreak > wstreak)
    			wstreak = cwstreak;
    	}
    	else
    	{
    		losses++;
    		clstreak++;
    		cwstreak = 0;
    		if (clstreak > lstreak)
    			lstreak = clstreak;
    	}

    }

    cout << "Wins: " << wins << "\tLosses: " << losses << endl;
    cout << "Win Streak: " << wstreak << "\tLoss Streak: " << lstreak << endl;
    cout << "Worst lose bet: " << twoify(BET, lstreak) << endl;

    system("PAUSE");
    cout << endl << endl;
    return main();
}

In particular, the twoify() function seems noobis. This is a martingale bet pattern, and basically every loss you double your previous bet until you win.

share|improve this question
    
Although I disagree with using a return statement in your implementation of twoify, and its name (how about doubleN or similar?), I'm happy your spacing is consistent and readable. This is VERY important to learn early. –  codebliss Nov 15 '09 at 3:39
3  
Don't go to Las Vegas with this algorithm. It's faster and less risky to make money by just going to work. Shifting or not. :p –  wilhelmtell Nov 15 '09 at 3:44
    
I like "Un-noobify" and look forward to seeing it in the dictionaries soon. –  pavium Nov 15 '09 at 4:06
    
@wilhelmtell: Agreed. The use of a betting system is the most noobish thing I see here. Or perhaps the OP is trying to prove that betting systems don't work. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martingale_(betting_system) –  ThisSuitIsBlackNot Nov 15 '09 at 4:09
    
@pavium: I thought it was "de-noobify" ;-) –  Steve Jessop Nov 15 '09 at 16:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

First, avoid the useless recursion, turn it into iteration:

int twoify(int num, int times)
{
    do {
      num *= 2;
      --times;
    } while (times >= 0);
    return num;
}

But, you can do better (if times > 0 is guaranteed, which would also simplify the version above by allowing you to use a while instead of the do/while, but, anyway...):

int twoify(int num, int times)
{
    return num << (times + 1);
}

The reason this works is that it's equivalent to multiplying num by 2 raised to the (times + 1)th power, which is what the recursive and iterative versions both do.

share|improve this answer
int twoify(int num, int times) {
    return num << (times + 1);  // num * 2**(times+1)
}
share|improve this answer
    
MATH! twoify(5,3) = 2(2(2(5))) = (2^3)*5 Grandpa, your twoify(5,0) = 10. Should be just (times) not (times + 1). –  codebliss Nov 15 '09 at 3:37
    
@codebliss: you're wrong, it's times+1 if you want the function to output the same as the OP's function. –  JRL Nov 15 '09 at 3:42
    
The OP's twoify(5,0) is also 10. –  Grandpa Nov 15 '09 at 3:44

It's unclear why twoify is a recursive method. Maybe this was used during the class to introduce or illustrate recursion, but clearly this could be replaced by a function which multiplies num by 2^times. This can be expressed with the exponentiation mathematical operator of the C language or, as shown in other response, by doing a left shift operation, shifting by as many bits as the exponent (the "times" argument, here)

share|improve this answer
    
OP wanted to "un-noobify" though. To me that entails, among other things, eliminating excess recursion. –  Chris Nov 15 '09 at 3:28

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