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I have a dataset of variables

Year    Age Bag Computer
2008    0   4   4
2008    1   5   3
2008    2   5   12.5
2008    3   5   15
2008    4   5   33
2008    5   5   11
2008    85  5   3.5
2008    .   .   .
2008    108 0   0
2008    109 0   0
2008    110+    0   0

I need to subset this in R in order to remove all the zero on my database and get this final table

Year    Age Bag Computer
2008    0   4   4
2008    1   5   3
2008    2   5   12.5
2008    3   5   15
2008    4   5   33
2008    5   5   11
2008    7   5   14.5
2008    8   5       17

without zero for the older ages.

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2  
Don't know why the data.table tag was added; there doesn't seem to be any indication the OP is using it. Given that they're asking for help on basic indexing, I doubt that they would be using what is a pretty advanced R data structure/package. –  Hong Ooi Jun 28 '13 at 18:00

4 Answers 4

If you want to identify the rows at which the 0 appears in columns Bag or Computer (assuming your dataframe is named dat, you would use:

bad.rows <- which(dat$Bag==0 | dat$Computer==0)

You could subset them out as:

subset(dat, !rownames(dat) %in% bad.rows)

Or you could skip the step of identifying the rows and just use subset:

subset(dat, Bag!=0 & Computer!=0)

Note the negation of the equalities meant one might need to switch to using "&" (or perhaps that was not what you wanted.) Your description was a bit vague on that aspect. Could be you only wanted to remove them if both were zero or remove ages which had all zeros above a particular age.

subset(dat, !(Bag==0 & Computer==0) ) #  ages with any non-zero
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The !rownames(dat) %in% bad.rows is going to be less efficient than inverting the original condition, since %in% has to perform an additional linear scan for every item of dat, yielding quadratic rather than linear worst-case performance. I think that’d be worth mentioning. –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 28 '13 at 14:21
    
I don't know if that is true. I have not seen %in% performing poorly in benchmarks –  BondedDust Jun 28 '13 at 14:31
    
Probably because the data sets were reasonably small. But think about what %in% does and you’ll see that this approach must have quadratic performance. Actually, using bad.rows can be done much simpler and more efficient by using dat[-bad.rows, ]. –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 28 '13 at 14:37
    
Agree on second point at least. I'm not going to deprecate or warn about %in% because it has never burned me. Lots of other things to be more worried about. –  BondedDust Jun 28 '13 at 14:39
    
DWin, you don't need dat$ inside subset. –  Arun Jun 28 '13 at 18:14

To subset a table, use … well, subset:

newTable <- subset(oldTable, Bag != 0)

Or, equivalently,

newTable <- oldTable[oldTable$Bag != 0, ]

It’s unclear what exactly your criterion is. If you want to remove any row where either Bar or Computer is 0, then you can combine the condition:

newTable <- subset(oldTable, Bag != 0 & Computer != 0)

(The other syntax also works.)

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I think the other rows had the data. The Age column wasn't what was to be tested. –  BondedDust Jun 28 '13 at 14:06
    
@DWin Upon re-reading I agree, even though OP explicitly said “I need to subset this … and get this final table without zero for the older ages” which would then appear to be wrong. –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 28 '13 at 14:17

Another way:

df[with(df, complete.cases(cbind(Bag, Computer)/0)), ]

Benchmarking on bigger data:

set.seed(45)
sz <- 1e6
df <- data.frame(Year=sample(1930:2013, sz, replace=TRUE), 
                 Age=sample(100, sz, replace=TRUE), 
                 Bag = sample(0:5, sz, TRUE), 
                 Computer=sample(0:10, sz, TRUE))

simon <- function(dt) {
    idx <- apply( dt , 1 , function(x) any( x[-2] == 0 ) )
    dt[ !idx , ]
}

dwin_konrad <- function(dt) {
    subset(dt, Bag != 0 & Computer != 0)
}

arun <- function(dt) {
    dt[with(dt, complete.cases(cbind(Bag, Computer)/0)), ]
}

require(microbenchmark)
microbenchmark(o1 <- simon(df), o2 <- dwin_konrad(df), o3 <- arun(df), times=5)

Unit: milliseconds
                  expr        min         lq     median         uq        max neval
       o1 <- simon(df) 15971.7720 16348.4055 16540.6794 18153.9090 18443.5480     5
 o2 <- dwin_konrad(df)   402.7010   419.3139   494.9592   723.1468   745.5400     5
        o3 <- arun(df)   320.8689   324.0388   334.0515   335.8886   366.6647     5

identical(o1, o2) # TRUE
identical(o1, o3) # TRUE
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Looks like you want to subset such that if you have a zero in any column except Age the row is removed. I'd use apply to run over the rows and use a logical comparison to see if any value (except age) is equal to 0 So I'd do this (assuming database is called df):

#  Return a logical vector. TRUE if any value in row == 0
#  x[-2] removes the df$Age column from comparison
idx <- apply( df , 1 , function(x) any( x[-2] == 0 ) )

#  Use this to subset
df[ !idx , ]
#  Year Age Bag Computer
#1 2008   0   4      4.0
#2 2008   1   5      3.0
#3 2008   2   5     12.5
#4 2008   3   5     15.0
#5 2008   4   5     33.0
#6 2008   5   5     11.0
#7 2008  85   5      3.5

EDIT

Because @Arun complained I was being slow (I was - but I was going for convenience code that would easily allow you to stick a dataframe or matrix with lots of columns to test on) I throw in the canonical (and fastest!) way of subsetting this would be:

df[ df$Bag == 0 | df$Computer == 0 , ]

Which was implicitly covered in the answer @Konrad gave anyway.

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Simon, you should vectorise this operation by doing == once and then summing up to see if they are > 0. This'll be (see benchmark in my answer) very slow. –  Arun Jun 28 '13 at 18:14
    
@Arun fair enough. I added what I consider to be the canonical way of subsetting this. But it'll get tiresome if it's more than a couple of columns. –  Simon O'Hanlon Jul 1 '13 at 22:16

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