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I'm using sed to filter a list of files. I have a sorted list of folders and I want to get all lines after a specific one. To do this task I'm using the solution described here which works pretty well with any input I tried but it doesn't work when the match is on the first line. In that case sed will remove all lines of the input

Here it's an example:

(ssh) fabio@s2 : ~
[0] % ls -1 /
bin
boot
...
sys
tmp
usr
var
vmlinuz

(ssh) fabio@s2 : ~
[0] % ls -1 / | sed '1,/tmp/d'
usr
var
vmlinuz

(ssh) fabio@s2 : ~
[0] % ls -1 / | sed '1,/^bin$/d'
# sed will delete all lines from the input stream

How should I change the command to consider also the limit case when first line is matched by regexp?

BTW sed '1,1d' correctly works and remove the first line only.

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Thank you for a comment. Corrected and added few other solutions too. –  jm666 Jun 28 '13 at 17:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

try this (GNU sed only):

sed '0,/^bin$/d'

..output is:

$sed '0,/^bin$/d' file
boot
...
sys
tmp
usr
var
vmlinuz
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This seems the best option. I saw your previous answer which states that it works for GNU sed, now you removed that. I'm using GNU sed, so for me this is the right answer, but just for curiosity, will it work for non GNU sed? –  Fabio Jun 28 '13 at 12:54
    
there is no GNU specific command, it should work, told me my text book. –  Endoro Jun 28 '13 at 12:58
    
It doesn't work on OS X sed, but as I told you I need it on a gnu system. –  Fabio Jun 28 '13 at 13:02
    
Argh! 0,/_Address_/ is GNU enhancement, should work for you. –  Endoro Jun 28 '13 at 13:03

This sed command will print all lines after and including the matching line:

sed -n '/^WHATEVER$/,$p'

The -n switch makes sed print only when told (the p command).

If you don't want the matching line pipe it through tail -n +2.

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I've explored also this option and i quit because of inclusion of matching line. I missed the tail -n +2 option. So this is also good. Thanks. –  Fabio Jun 28 '13 at 13:00

you can also try with :

awk '/searchname/{p=1;next}{if(p){print}}'
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