Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is my old code and I decided to refactor it in order to make refuse easier, but now I wonder if it can be done even simpler.

public class AccountConstraint {
    private Range<Integer> accountId;
    private String username;
    private String password;
    private String email;

    public AccountConstraint(Object accountId, final String username, final String password, final String email) {
        if (accountId instanceof Integer) {
            accountId = new Range<>(accountId);
        }
        this.accountId = (Range<Integer>)accountId;
        this.username = username;
        this.password = password;
        this.email = email;
    }
}

public class Range<T> {
    private T min;
    private T max;

    public Range(T min, T max) {
        this.min = min;
        this.max = max;
    }

    public Range(T value) {
        this.min = value;
        this.max = value;
    }

    public T getMin() {
        return min;
    }

    public T getMax() {
        return max;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "[" + min + ", " + max + "]";
    }
}

With this you can create an AccountConstraint that has as accountId either an Integer or a Range<Integer> and ensures that it is always saved as a Range<Integer>.

Background information here is that you should be able to just enter an integer like 5 and that it will be automatically stored as Range(5) = Range(5, 5) then.

The code works fine, but it seems a bit messy. So I came up with the following improvement:

New constructor:

public AccountConstraint(Object accountId, final String username, final String password, final String email) {
    this.accountId = Range.<Integer>getRange(accountId, Integer.class);
    this.username = username;
    this.password = password;
    this.email = email;
}

New method:

public static <T> Range<T> getRange(Object object, Class<? extends T> clazz) {
    if (clazz.isInstance(object)) {
        object = new Range<>((T)object);
    }
    return (Range<T>)object;
}

It also works and it seems better in my opinion as it can be done as a one-liner now, but can it even be done better? More specifically, can the Class<? exends T> be left out?

And a small question: Should it be Class<T> clazz or Class? extends T> clazz?

Regards.

EDIT: Implemented the Builder Pattern as suggested, because there is a possibility that there will be more arguments that can be overloaded. New code:

package dao.constraint;

public class AccountConstraint {
    private Range<Integer> accountId;
    private String username;
    private String password;
    private String email;

    private AccountConstraint(Builder builder) {
        this.accountId = builder.accountId;
        this.username = builder.username;
        this.password = builder.password;
        this.email = builder.email;
    }

    public Range<Integer> getAccountId() {
        return accountId;
    }

    public String getUsername() {
        return username;
    }

    public String getPassword() {
        return password;
    }

    public String getEmail() {
        return email;
    }

    public static class Builder {
        private Range<Integer> accountId;
        private String username;
        private String password;
        private String email;

        public Builder() {
            this.accountId = null;
            this.username = null;
            this.password = null;
            this.email = null;
        }

        public Builder accountId(final int accountId) {
            this.accountId = new Range<>(accountId);
            return this;
        }

        public Builder accountId(final Range<Integer> accountId) {
            this.accountId = accountId;
            return this;
        }

        public Builder username(final String username) {
            this.username = username;
            return this;
        }

        public Builder password(final String password) {
            this.password = password;
            return this;
        }

        public Builder email(final String email) {
            this.email = email;
            return this;
        }

        public AccountConstraint build() {
            return new AccountConstraint(this);
        }
    }
}

An extra nice feature now is that the fields that are not-mandatory do not need to be filled in anymore as the default value is null for them anyways.

share|improve this question
6  
Erm, most people would create two constructors. –  Brian Roach Jun 28 '13 at 13:22
    
You could create a builder having two different methods .withUniqueValue(), .withRange() –  fge Jun 28 '13 at 13:22
1  
You seem to be trying to write Python code in Java. –  Slater Tyranus Jun 28 '13 at 13:23
    
Isn't your one-liner require creating a supporting 4-liner? Isn't alternative constructor neater? Also, Why constructors? Cannot you apply your polymorphism to simple methods? –  Val Jun 28 '13 at 13:25
1  
99% of the time decalaring a variable Object is a bad idea –  Richard Tingle Jun 28 '13 at 13:31

2 Answers 2

Neither, use overloading...

public AccountConstraint(Integer accountId, final String username, 
         final String password, final String email) {
    this(new Range<Integer>(accountId), username, password, email);
}

public AccountConstraint(Range<Integer> accountId, final String username, 
         final String password, final String email) {
    this.accountId = accountId;
    this.username = username;
    this.password = password;
    this.email = email;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - I removed the unneeded cast in the second constructor. –  Brian Roach Jun 28 '13 at 13:24
    
I do not want to use overloading as there might be a lot of arguments having this same construct, which would lead to 2^(those_arguments) constructors. If age for example would be stored, then it would need to use the same construct as accountId. –  skiwi Jun 28 '13 at 13:32
    
@skiwi Is one AccountConstraint going to take (for example) accountId and age simulaneously? Or will there be two instances of AccountConstraint, each one taking accountId or age? –  Richard Tingle Jun 28 '13 at 13:37
1  
@skiwi If you are going to have a large number of arguments that varies, then the Builder Pattern is what you want. If you don't own 'Effective Java' from Josh Bloch ... you should. –  Brian Roach Jun 28 '13 at 13:40

One possibility is to use a builder, like so (code to be improved):

public final class AccountConstraintBuilder
{
    private Range<Integer> accountId;
    private String username;
    private String password;
    private String email;

    public AccountConstraintsBuilder()
    {
    }

    public AccountConstraintsBuilder withUsername(final String username)
    {
        this.username = username;
        return this;
    }

    // password, email...

    public AccountConstraintsBuilder withUniqueValue(final int value)
    {
        return withRange(value, value);    
    }

    public AccountConstraintsBuilder withRange(final int min, final int max)
    {
        accountId = new Range<Integer>(min, max);
        return this;
    }

    public AccountConstraint build()
    {
        return new AccountConstraint(accountId, username, password, email);
    }
}

This would then allow to have only one constructor on AccountConstraint: the one with a Range as an argument. Also, builders are a great place to enforce constraints: your instance constructor has nothing to do but "blindly" accept its arguments.

Note: I guess instance parameters in your AccountConstraint could be final, too.

Note2: this could be a static inner class to AccountConstraint instead; and a static factory method could be created so that you could do:

AccountConstraint.newBuilder().withUsername().etc().etc().build();
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.