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Is it possible to count a repeating part of a sequence in R? For example:

x<- c(1,3.0,3.1,3.2,1,1,2,3.0,3.1,3.2,4,4,5,6,5,3.0,3.1,3.2,
      3.1,2,1,4,6,4.0,4,3.0,3.1,3.2,5,3.2,3.0,4)

Is it possible to count the times that the subsequence 3.0,3.1,3.2 occurs? So in this example it must be: 4

share|improve this question
    
Do you just want to count that particular subsequence? Or do you want to identify any other subsequences that might be in your data? –  Ananda Mahto Jun 28 '13 at 14:13
4  
Insert standard warning about matching floating-point values. Unless you need to keep everything numeric, you may want to run your data through sprintf("%2f",mydata) or equivalent so you can do exact matches on strings. –  Carl Witthoft Jun 28 '13 at 14:34

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I'd do something like this:

pattern <- c(3, 3.1, 3.2)
len1 <- seq_len(length(x) - length(pattern) + 1)
len2 <- seq_len(length(pattern))-1
sum(colSums(matrix(x[outer(len1, len2, '+')], 
     ncol=length(len1), byrow=TRUE) == pattern) == length(len2))

PS: by changing sum to which you'll get the start of each instance.

share|improve this answer

One more (generic moving window) approach:

x <- c(1,3.0,3.1,3.2,1,1,2,3.0,3.1,3.2,4,4,5,6,5,3.0,3.1,3.2, 3.1,2,1,4,6,4.0,4,3.0,3.1,3.2,5,3.2,3.0,4)
s <- c(3, 3.1, 3.2)

sum(apply(embed(x, length(s)), 1, function(y) {all(y == rev(s))}))
# [1] 4

See output of embed to understand what's happening.

As Arun points out apply here is pretty slow, and one can use embed together with Arun's matrix trick to get this to be a lot faster:

sum(colSums(matrix(embed(x, length(s)),
                   byrow = TRUE, nrow = length(s)) == rev(s)) == length(s))
share|improve this answer
    
I ran across embed at first as well. But a vector scan required taking transpose. Or one should be using apply. I reverted therefore to constructing the matrix row-wise. –  Arun Jun 28 '13 at 15:28
1  
makes sense, I just tested and this is slightly faster than your outer approach when one gets rid of apply and does your matrix thing; I'll edit that approach in as well –  eddi Jun 28 '13 at 15:32

You could turn it into a string, and use gregexpr.

sum(gregexpr("3 3.1 3.2", paste(x, collapse=" "), fixed=TRUE)[[1]] != -1)
[1]  4
share|improve this answer
1  
This'll give an answer of 1 when there's no match, because gregexpr returns -1 in case of no match. –  Arun Jun 28 '13 at 14:28
2  
this gives incorrect results for overlapping sequences: x = c(1,2,2,2,3,2,2); s = c(2,2) –  eddi Jun 28 '13 at 15:16
    
@eddi It's a bit silly to say it's "incorrect" when you actually have no idea what the OP wants to do with overlapping sequences, or in fact, if overlapping sequences need to be considered at all. –  Hong Ooi Jun 28 '13 at 15:27
    
@HongOoi I think you should attempt to fix instead of getting defensive, the fact that this does smth else for overlapping sequences than the other solutions should at least give you a pause –  eddi Jun 28 '13 at 15:40
2  
@HongOoi FWIW If you want to catch overlapping patterns, you could wrap the pattern in a lookahead assertion, and set fixed=FALSE, perl=TRUE. –  Matthew Plourde Jun 28 '13 at 16:20

Carl Witthoft's seqle function might be useful for you here.

The function looks like this:

seqle <- function(x,incr=1) { 
    if(!is.numeric(x)) x <- as.numeric(x) 
    n <- length(x)  
    y <- x[-1L] != x[-n] + incr 
    i <- c(which(y|is.na(y)),n) 
    list(lengths = diff(c(0L,i)),
         values = x[head(c(0L,i)+1L,-1L)]) 
}

Applied to your data, it should look like this:

temp <- seqle(x, incr=.1)
temp
# $lengths
#  [1] 1 3 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1
# 
# $values
#  [1] 1.0 3.0 1.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 4.0 5.0 6.0 5.0 3.0 3.1 2.0 1.0 4.0
# [17] 6.0 4.0 4.0 3.0 5.0 3.2 3.0 4.0

Now, how do we read that? lengths tells us that our vector had a sequence of 1, then of 3, then of 1, and of 1, and of 1, and of 3.... values tells us that the first value of the sequence of length 3 was "3.0", the first value of the next sequence of length 3 was "3.0", and so on.

This is easier to see as a data.frame.

data.frame(temp)[temp$lengths > 1, ]
#    lengths values
# 2        3      3
# 6        3      3
# 12       3      3
# 20       3      3

In this example, the lengths of all the sequences are the same, and they start at the same value, so we can get your answer just by looking at the number of rows in the resulting data.frame above.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, even though I'm not sure if this is what the OP wants. For ex: the pattern could also be: c(10, 8, 15). –  Arun Jun 28 '13 at 14:44
    
@Arun, true. Just throwing it out there! –  Ananda Mahto Jun 28 '13 at 15:26
1  
I have to recuse myself from giving it a +1 for obvious reasons :-). But I am flattered that you'd reference my derivative work. –  Carl Witthoft Jun 28 '13 at 15:42
1  
@CarlWitthoft, you're being modest :). The function is plenty useful! Go ahead, give it a +1 :). –  Arun Jun 28 '13 at 15:55
1  
@CarlWitthoft, I've done so more than once here on SO! When are you going to package this thing up? –  Ananda Mahto Jun 28 '13 at 16:43

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