Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been deep diving into JavaScript lately and stumbled upon a question.

What is the difference between the following implementations of a object:

var myFunction1 = (function myFunction1() {})();

var myFunction2 = {}

var myFunction3 = function myFunction3() {}

Or with a longer example of the three implementations preforming the exact same task.

<script>
    var myFunction1 = (function myFunction1() {

      var _privateVar = 'Private var';
      this.publicVar = 'Public var';

      function init( newPrivate, newPublic) {
        _privateVar = newPrivate;
        this.publicVar = newPublic;
      }

      function getPrivateVar(){
        return _privateVar;
      }

      function setPrivateVar(string){
        _privateVar = string;
      }

      return {
        init: init,
        getPrivateVar: getPrivateVar,
        setPrivateVar: setPrivateVar
      }

    })();

    var myFunction2 = {

      _privateVar: 'Private var',
      publicVar: 'Public var',

      init: function init( newPrivate, newPublic) {
        this._privateVar = newPrivate;
        this.publicVar = newPublic;
      },

      getPrivateVar: function getPrivateVar(){
        return this._privateVar;
      },

      setPrivateVar: function setPrivateVar(string){
        this._privateVar = string;
      }

    }

    var myFunction3 = function myFunction3() {

      var _privateVar = 'Private var';
      this.publicVar = 'Public var';

      function init( newPrivate, newPublic) {
        _privateVar = newPrivate;
        this.publicVar = newPublic;
      }

      function getPrivateVar(){
        return _privateVar;
      }

      function setPrivateVar(string){
        _privateVar = string;
      }

      return {
        init: init,
        getPrivateVar: getPrivateVar,
        setPrivateVar: setPrivateVar
      }

    }

    var a, b, c;
    a = myFunction1;
    a.init('Private var updated', 'Public var updated');
    console.log('== A ==');
    console.log(a.publicVar); // Public var updated
    console.log(a._privateVar); // undefined
    console.log(a.getPrivateVar()); // Private var updated
    a.setPrivateVar('Private var is updated again');
    console.log(a.getPrivateVar()); // Private var is updated again

    b = myFunction2;
    b.init('Private var updated', 'Public var updated');
    console.log('== B ==');
    console.log(b.publicVar); // Public var updated
    console.log(b._privateVar); // Private var updated
    console.log(b.getPrivateVar()); // Private var updated
    b.setPrivateVar('Private var is updated again');
    console.log(b.getPrivateVar()); // Private var is updated again

    c = new myFunction3();
    c.init('Private var updated', 'Public var updated');
    console.log('== C ==');
    console.log(c.publicVar); // Public var updated
    console.log(c._privateVar); // undefined
    console.log(c.getPrivateVar()); // Private var updated
    c.setPrivateVar('Private var is updated again');
    console.log(c.getPrivateVar()); // Private var is updated again
</script>

I know that the two first examples are singletons, and last one allows me to create multiple objects. But what are the difference between the first two? Or are they the same, just written a little different?

share|improve this question
1  
In your first example var myFunction1 = (function myFunction1() {})(); doesn't give you an object. It stores the return value of the function into myFunction1. –  nderscore Jun 28 '13 at 14:25
    
@nderscore Yes, but isn't myFunction2 doing that exact same thing aswell? –  jamietelin Jun 28 '13 at 14:27
1  
No; myFunction2 is not a function. –  SLaks Jun 28 '13 at 14:29
    
The curly braces have different meaning depending upon how they're used. They can denote object literal syntax, or a block statement, or a function body. –  Crazy Train Jun 28 '13 at 14:32
    
...they also have meaning within a regular expression. –  Crazy Train Jun 28 '13 at 14:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The first example creates a function myFunction1() and executes it, storing the result (not a function) in the variable myFunction1 — in this case, the name myFunction1 first contains a function, then (once it's executed) it contains the result.

myFunction2 is not a function at all. The brackets {} are an object literal, creating an empty object.

myFunction3 is the only function in the example. In this case it does nothing.

share|improve this answer
    
I was too slow in typing and the comments scooped me on half the answer. If anyone wants to improve this answer, have at it. –  iamnotmaynard Jun 28 '13 at 14:35

In your first example, you are using an IIFE (immediately-invoked function expression) to keep private state.

You can't access _privateVar because variables declared inside an IIFE are in a closure.

share|improve this answer
    
You cannot access _privateVar declared inside myFunction2 either. But I get the fact that my second example isn’t a function at all. But what is the functional difference? It performs the same task? –  jamietelin Jun 28 '13 at 14:47
    
@jamietelin : Hum no, I can confirm that you can access _privateVar in myFunction2. This is the functional difference –  Romain Meresse Jun 28 '13 at 14:52
    
Have you copy / pasted and tested the code? I get undefined (updated my question with output) –  jamietelin Jun 28 '13 at 14:56
    
@jamietelin : do console.log(b._privateVar); instead of console.log(b.privateVar); ;) –  Romain Meresse Jun 28 '13 at 14:58
    
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH. Ofcource! –  jamietelin Jun 28 '13 at 14:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.