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I am attempting a question from the Java tutorial where I have to create a program that output the sum of numbers from a sentence. Though the numbers are written in a text format. I want to accomplish this myself though i have stumbled upon a few difficulties that i would like some advice on.

An example of the question is that one child has thirteen balloons and is selling them for three hundred cents.

Obviously I have to set up the variables so the string numbers are converted into an integers e.g.

int one = 1, two = 2, three = 3, twelve = 12, thirty = 30, hundred = 100;

My initial attempt is to create a loop where I have assigned a count to stop when all the numbers have been accumulated, though the loop keeps on adding the the first number.

My question is, when I input the text using the scanner object, what loop is required to add the first (written) number and then move onto the second (written) number, which will be added to the sum variable?

Thanks for your time and I hope that this question is easy to understand.

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1  
If you show your code, we can tell you why it keeps on adding the the first number – jlordo Jun 28 '13 at 14:41
    
There is no need to add the major tag in the title. Put the values into an array (if you know how many there will be at start-up, or an expandable collection (e.g. List or ArrayList). They are both easy to iterate. – Andrew Thompson Jun 28 '13 at 14:41
    
Im will post the code that i have written... – user2141414 Jun 28 '13 at 14:48

My question is, when I input the text using the scanner object, what loop is required to add the first (written) number and then move onto the second (written) number, which will be added to the sum variable?

Not sure I understood but, first you read word by word (in a loop, right) and for each word you check whether it matches one of the strings from the textual numbers list ("one", "fifty", "million"). If it matches, add that number to the sum.

I would also suggest putting textual representation of numbers in a map, so you can query it faster with an input word (another option would be checking if an ArrayList contains this word, and making many iterations for many words is slower).

Map<String, Integer> map = new HashMap<String, Integer>();
map.put("one", 1);

And the program would do something like:

int sum=0;
for (String word : text) {
    Integer value= map.get(key);
    sum += (value == null ? 0 : value);
}

Although you did not mention it, it can happen that you have a number "three hundred". This solution is not good for that.

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this way "three hundred" would be sum up to 103 instead of 300 – jlordo Jun 28 '13 at 14:43
    
thats correct but do i need a do while loop to multiple them together? – user2141414 Jun 28 '13 at 14:50
    
@jlordo that are his specs. – darijan Jun 28 '13 at 14:50

From what I understand, you can do something like this: iterate through the scanner with while(scanner.hasNext()) then assign a temp variable to the next element the scanner grabs. Check to see if it matches any of the numbers, if it does add it to a count variable thats defined outside of the while loop.

int count = 0;
Scanner sc = new Scanner(system.in);
while(sc.hasNext()){
  String temp = sc.next()
  if(temp.equals(arrayOfNumbers){
     //add the number to the variable count
   }
}
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I would recommend a StringTokenizer. This will allow you to analyze each word one by one.

StringTokenizer st = new StringTokenizer(yourString);
String firstNumber = st.nextToken();
String secondNumber = st.nextToken();

A good way to compare these numbers would be to set up arrays with indexes that somehow correspond to their values (i.e. "one" would be pointed to at DIGITS[0]).

public static final String[] DIGITS = {"one", "two", "three", "four", "five", "six", "seven", "eight", "nine", null};
public static final String[] TENS = {null, "twenty", "thirty", "forty", "fifty", "sixty", "seventy", "eighty", "ninety", null};
public static final String[] TEENS = {"ten", "eleven", "twelve", "thirteen", "fourteen", "fifteen", "sixteen", "seventeen", "eighteen", "nineteen"};

Spoiler alert: below is a rough method I wrote recently to convert a number (below 1 quadrillion) from a string of words to a number. Might be what you are looking for. Again, if this is for self learning, I wouldn't recommend copying/pasting the code, rather understanding how it works.

public static final String[] DIGITS = {"one", "two", "three", "four", "five", "six", "seven", "eight", "nine", null};
public static final String[] TENS = {null, "twenty", "thirty", "forty", "fifty", "sixty", "seventy", "eighty", "ninety", null};
public static final String[] TEENS = {"ten", "eleven", "twelve", "thirteen", "fourteen", "fifteen", "sixteen", "seventeen", "eighteen", "nineteen"};
public static final String[] MAGNITUDES = {null, null, null, "thousand", null, null, "million", null, null, "billion", null, null, "trillion"};
public static final String[] ZERO = {"zero", "oh"};

public static double wordToNumber(String input) {
    double result = 0;
    String[] decimal = input.split("point");
    StringTokenizer set = new StringTokenizer(decimal[0]);

    boolean negative = false;
    if (input.contains("negative")) {
        negative = true;
    }

    double group = 0;

    while (set.hasMoreTokens()) {
        String word = set.nextToken();

        for (int i = 0; i < MAGNITUDES.length; i += 3) {
            if (word.equals(MAGNITUDES[i])) {
                group = group * Math.pow(10, i);
                result = result + group;
                group = 0;
            }
        }

        if (word.equals("hundred")) {
            group = group * 100;
        }
        else {
            for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
                if (word.equals(DIGITS[i])) {
                    group = group + i + 1;
                }
                if (word.equals(TEENS[i])) {
                    group = group + 10 + i;
                }
                if (word.equals(TENS[i])) {
                    group = group + 10 * (i + 1);
                }
            }
        }
    }

    result = result + group;

    if (decimal.length > 1) {
        StringTokenizer hang = new StringTokenizer(decimal[1]);
        int n = -1;

        while (hang.hasMoreTokens()) {
            String word = hang.nextToken();

            for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
                if (word.equals(DIGITS[i])) {
                    result = result + (i + 1) * Math.pow(10, n);
                }
            }

            n--;
        }
    }

    if (negative) {
        result = result * (-1);
    }

    return result;
}

Input of "negative seventy eight million three hundred eighty thousand six hundred one point five zero seven" returns a double of value -78380601.507.

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1  
Even the Java API recommend NOT to use StringTokenizer... Better use String#split – darijan Jun 28 '13 at 16:05
    
It's not deprecated which leaves it as an option. For this application it works flawlessly. If you are trying to split using /r/n or what have you, I would agree that String.split is a better option. – Elijah Jun 28 '13 at 17:09

I am not sure whether i am getting your question correct. But seems to be you want to convert number in written text to convert numerical value while counting them.

so you need to have kind of a mapping between text and number. then you may able to get numerical value and add those.

but you have to define a mapping for each and every number will find you.

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