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I am new to SOLR and reading its documentation. I am not able to figure out what they mean when they use term document. It almost felt like record initially but then more i read i can relate it to different things like actual document (word,pdf etc.. ) or field.. can someone clarify what it really refers to?

for example http://lucene.apache.org/solr/ under detail feature -> schema they are calling something as document. I also checked their terminology page which did not have the reference. http://wiki.apache.org/solr/SolrTerminology

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Maybe the answer on this stackoverflow.com/questions/2095587/… can help you. –  Alfergon Jun 28 '13 at 15:20
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1 Answer 1

I was also confused by the term document when I was looking into MongoDB :-). You can see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Document-oriented_database.

Solr document is roughly equivalent to a row in a database table. But Solr (and MongoDB) document can better be thought as an "aggregate" row. (NoSQL Distilled uses the term aggregate-oriented database.)

In DB world, you may store data from different tables into an aggregate table for easy data retrieval. Similarly, you may bring data from different DB tables and store in a Solr document for faster searching or rich text analysis or faceting or any other Solr feature that is either infeasible or inefficient with a database (or your existing data store).

You can also think of Solr (and Mongo) documents as JSON objects, or more simply as key-value pairs. While Mongo allows you to store nested documents, Solr does not.

An example nested Mongo document:

{
Title: NoSQL Distilled,
Authors: [{name: Pramod Sadalage, age: 35}, 
          {name: Martin Fowler, age: 40}],
PubYear: 2012,
Preface: <preface contents>,
BodyText: <entire content of the book>
}

You can see the Authors field itself contains 2 documents.

But in Solr, nesting is not allowed, so, you may store that document like (making sure the indices match for Authors and AuthorAges):

{
Title: NoSQL Distilled,
Authors: [Pramod Sadalage, Martin Fowler],
AuthorAges: [35, 40],
PubYear: 2012,
Preface: <preface contents>,
BodyText: <entire content of the book>
}

The above document may be stored in the database world in a "normalized" manner and you may use JOINs to fetch all the above fields. For example, books table may only have the unique fields title and pubYear with a book_id primary key. You will have another table authors that has primary key author_id and name and age. Then you will have a table book_authors and map the authors to the book. Then you JOIN across these tables to fetch the fields you want. In the "document" world, you bring all these fields into a single document.

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