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I have a table in MySQL and it has two very important fields STATUS and DATE.

In the STATUS field values can be "wait", 'ok", "2edit", or "no", so to get the values i use "SELECT * FROM table ORDER BY FIELD(request_status, 'wait', '2edit', 'ok', 'no')"

So far so good. But I need the results that have STATUS = "wait", to be in DATE order. Is it possible?

I hope I have passed the idea!

Thank you.

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1  
ORDER BY CASE WHEN... THEN... END –  Strawberry Jun 28 '13 at 15:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Ofcourse this is possible =)

Take a look at http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/order-by-optimization.html

SELECT * FROM table ORDER BY FIELD(request_status, 'wait', '2edit', 'ok', 'no'), `DATE` ASC|DESC
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Just add a second sorting condition:

... ORDER BY
      FIELD(request_status, 'wait', '2edit', 'ok', 'no'),
      `date`

In case you did not want to alter the order of row where request_status <> 'wait', you could do this (but formally, this does not make sense, because the order of rows is officially undefined without an ORDER BY clause):

... ORDER BY
      FIELD(request_status, 'wait', '2edit', 'ok', 'no'),
      IF(request_status = 'wait', `date`, 0)

... but you shouldn't do either version, as such a query is unable to use any index to honor the ORDER BY clause. This is because of the function call that needs to be made for each and every row to be sorted.

Instead, you should add an order field with a proper index on it, and ORDER BY this field. Then your final query would look like this:

... ORDER BY request_status_order, `date`

And if you want to comply with the normalisation best practices, extract your statuses into a new status table. Join your main table with this table. Use the desired order index as a primary key for this new table.

CREATE TABLE statuses (
    status_index INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
    label VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL
);

CREATE TABLE main_table (
    id INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
    `date` DATETIME NOT NULL,
    status_index INT NOT NULL,
    other_fields VARCHAR(10),
    CONSTRAINT fk_status FOREIGN KEY fk_status_idx (status_index)
        REFERENCES statuses (status_index)
);

SELECT * FROM main_table
JOIN statuses USING (status_index)
ORDER BY status_index, `date`;
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I like the normalization, because this is really needed when performance is required. –  Sander Visser Jun 28 '13 at 16:55

Something like this might work. The second part of the if statement doesn't matter, as long as it's a date.

select * from table 
ORDER BY FIELD(request_status, 'wait', '2edit', 'ok', 'no'),
if(request_status = 'wait', date, '2013-01-01') 

SQL Fiddle

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You can generally sort the data according to date after sorting by request_status

SELECT * FROM table 
ORDER BY FIELD(request_status, 'wait', '2edit', 'ok', 'no'), 
         `date`
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+ but note, all request_statuses will be in ascending date order. Not just wait. However, there is no other alternative. This is the answer. –  Jason McCreary Jun 28 '13 at 15:07

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