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Say I have two hashes that share one key (for example "foo") but different values. Now I want to create a method with one attribute that puts out the value of the key depending on which hash I chose as attribute. How do I do that?

I have tried:

def put_hash(hash)
   puts hash("foo")
end

but when I call this function with a hash it gives me the error below:

undefined method `hash' for main:Object (NoMethodError) 
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closed as off-topic by sawa, Stewie, Stony, Mario, Jeremy J Starcher Jun 29 '13 at 3:08

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to access the value with []:

puts hash["foo"]

Otherwise Ruby thinks you're trying to invoke a method with (), and you're seeing an error because there is no method called hash in that scope.

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Have you tried:

def put_hash(hash)
   puts hash["foo"]
end

Or better yet:

def put_hash(hash)
   puts hash[:foo]
end

Ruby stores the values in a hash like this:

{ :foo => "bar" }

or

 { "foo" => "bar" }

Depending if you use a Symbol or a String

To access them you need to call the [] method in the Hash class

The Ruby Docs are always a good starting point.

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Write it as

def put_hash(hash)
   puts hash["foo"]
end
h1 = { "foo" => 1 }
h2 = { "foo" => 2 }
put_hash(h2) # => 2

Look here Hash#[]

Element Reference—Retrieves the value object corresponding to the key object

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